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Patteeu Memorial Political Forum>J Whit does some good work
HonestChieffan 06:38 AM 06-08-2021

Here's some news mixed with a powerful column. Please read and share. https://t.co/eizK6bGo1X

— Jason Whitlock (@WhitlockJason) June 8, 2021

[Reply]
cosmo20002 11:17 PM 06-11-2021
Originally Posted by ghak99:
Reward failure with probation and a half way house? That sounds like the first step toward participation ribbon bullshit. They had their whole life to figure it out.

If I had my way, Darwin would be demoted from salary to per contract. He's obviously slacking and needs to do a better job of filtering prior to the final sort.
Sure, an eternity of torture seems perfectly reasonable as punishment for not properly praising someone, regardless of other good deeds performed during a lifetime.
[Reply]
cosmo20002 11:21 PM 06-11-2021
Originally Posted by Imon Yourside:
He won't break his rules for any reason, it's not that hard to understand. If someone jumps from a building should he then change how gravity works? Better if we were to listen to him and not jump thinking it was a great idea.
What a ridiculous example.
[Reply]
Chiefshrink 11:21 PM 06-11-2021
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis:
If you must be born again to enter the Kingdom of God, does that mean you believe in universal salvation?
Jesus said in John 14:6-
6 Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

Notice He did not say "a way" or "some way" or "a truth" or "some truth" or "a life or "some life" as if there are other options(other religions).
[Reply]
SuperBowl4 04:20 AM 06-12-2021
Originally Posted by GloryDayz:
Cool weather does tend to make people happy. It's people living in the heat that tend to feel the need to claim that cold sucks. All while they run from one air conditioned place to the next. With a ride in an Air Conditioned car in between. That's why heaven is usually depicted as a cool cloud and hell is hot.

https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/re...210035590.html


The top 20 happiest countries in the world

Finland

Iceland

Denmark

Switzerland

Netherlands

Sweden

Germany

Norway

New Zealand

Austria

Israel

Australia

Ireland

United States

Canada

Czech Republic

Belgium

United Kingdom

China

France
That list is preCovids.
[Reply]
Fat Elvis 04:01 PM 06-12-2021
Originally Posted by Chiefshrink:
Jesus said in John 14:6-
6 Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

Notice He did not say "a way" or "some way" or "a truth" or "some truth" or "a life or "some life" as if there are other options(other religions).
So let me get this straight: You're saying fetuses are innocent babies and that is why abortion is wrong--because you are taking the life of an innocent child. If they are innocent, are they excluded from salvation based upon your interpretation of scripture?
[Reply]
Chiefshrink 10:35 PM 06-12-2021
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis:
So let me get this straight: You're saying fetuses are innocent babies and that is why abortion is wrong--because you are taking the life of an innocent child. If they are innocent, are they excluded from salvation based upon your interpretation of scripture?
Do the souls of aborted babies go to heaven?

ANSWER

Abortion as we know it today was not practiced in biblical times, and the Bible never specifically mentions the issue of abortion. It is clear from the Scriptures that an unborn baby is known by the Lord, even from the time of conception (Psalm 139:13-16). Although the Bible does not mention abortion or aborted babies, we do have two keys to help us unlock the answer to the question of whether the souls of aborted babies go to heaven.

The first key is from the only passage in the Bible where something specific is said about the death of infants. In 2 Samuel 12 we learn of David’s affair with Bathsheba, another man’s wife. David was informed by the prophet Nathan that the child produced by that union would die. David then began to fast and pray, asking the Lord to not carry out His judgment. When the child did die, David got up from praying and fasting and ate something.

When asked about this behavior, David uttered the words recorded in 2 Samuel 12:23, “Now he is dead; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me.” David’s words reflect a clear understanding that the child could not come back to earth, but David would be with his child one day in heaven. This indicates not only David’s assurance of his own future in heaven (Psalm 23:6), but also the assurance that his child would share that future. From this account, we can conclude that infants who die are destined for heaven.

The second key to dealing with this issue is an understanding of the character and attributes of God. A God of justice must punish sin, for the Bible teaches us that “the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). Neither an unborn child nor an aborted baby has had the opportunity to willfully sin; however, every child conceived bears the sin nature inherited from Adam (Psalm 51:5) and is therefore subject to judgment. At the same time, God reveals Himself as a God of goodness and mercy (Psalm 136:26). He is “gracious in all His works” (Psalm 145:17). It could very well be that God, in His grace, applies the sacrifice of Christ to the unborn victims of abortion. We know Christ’s blood is sufficient for such a thing. After all, Jesus died “for the sins of the whole world” (1 John 2:2).

The Bible does not specifically say whether or not an unborn child who dies goes to heaven. Without a clear passage, we can only speculate. However, we know of God’s love, goodness, and compassion. We know of David’s confidence that he would be with his child again. And we know that Jesus invited the children to come to Him (Luke 18:16). Based on these sureties, we believe it is appropriate to conclude that the souls of children are immediately in the presence of God when their lives are cut short by abortion.

Part 2: If aborted babies go to heaven, why is abortion wrong?

ANSWER

We who defend the sanctity of life sometimes face questions similar to this: “Why do you say abortion is wrong, if babies go to heaven when they die?” That question often has a follow-up: “Aborted children never have a chance to grow up and reject Jesus; thus, by your own reasoning, abortion fills heaven and keeps people out of hell. Isn’t that a good thing?”

Considering abortion as mercifully sending babies to heaven is an invalid option for Christians for several reasons. First, if we believe that heaven and hell are real, then we have to believe that there is a God. And, if there’s a God, we need to care what He’s said on the subject of abortion. By that measure alone, we cannot justify killing the unborn, an action that God expressly forbids (Leviticus 20:1–5; 2 Kings 24:2–4). God commands us not to commit murder (Exodus 20:13), He knows the child before birth (Jeremiah 1:5), and, in the Mosaic Law, He prescribed punishment for killing an unborn child (Exodus 21:22–25). Abortion is never an act of mercy; it is always an act of shedding innocent blood (see Proverbs 6:16–17).

So, the first reason that we reject the idea of a mercy-motivated abortion is fairly simple: because God said not to kill. Regardless of what else we may think, God told us that killing the innocent is wrong. Period. Just as with a parent-child relationship, the only thing we ultimately need to know is that the Father has said, “No.”

The second reason that abortion cannot be justified as a merciful act is that we are not absolutely sure what happens to those who die before they are born. We have many good reasons to think they’ll be in heaven, but we don’t have explicit biblical proof. So we can’t definitively say that aborting a soul will rescue it from hell. We dare not take such an awful risk with the souls of other people.

With both of those reasons in mind, we can pose a useful statement: “God didn’t just kill Cain before he sinned.” That fact doesn’t tell us exactly why we should not abort a child for mercy’s sake, but it does tell us that God does not see killing to prevent sin as a viable option.

A third reason that we cannot justify abortion on the basis that it sends babies to heaven involves eternal rewards. An aborted child has been denied the chance to serve God in this life and gain rewards for heaven. A child killed in the womb is being denied the chance to honor God in this world and earn rewards in the world to come. The chance to serve God is one of the things abortion steals from a human being.

Logically, the attitude that abortion is merciful in that it sends babies straight to heaven would lead us to kill all children, unborn or not. After all, if it really is “better” for them to be dead, then we should do them the favor of killing them and sending them to a better place. Anyone who takes seriously the idea that babies in the womb should be killed to send them to heaven would logically have to favor the killing of every single child who is—in his opinion—under the age of accountability. Following the same rationale, he’d also be inclined to kill other believers to prevent them from sinning any more before they get to heaven.

Given that God is a God of logic, and given that He specifically tells us to protect the weak and innocent (Proverbs 31:8–9), to have children (Genesis 1:28), and to see them as a blessing (Psalm 127:4–5), we can’t justify abortion on any moral grounds whatsoever. Abortion is the murder of the unborn, and we can’t mitigate the heinous nature of the act by injecting some perverse sense of human “mercy” into the equation.


Where do I find the age of accountability in the Bible?

ANSWER

The concept of the “age of accountability” is that children are not held accountable by God for their sins until they reach a certain age, and that if a child dies before reaching the “age of accountability,” that child will, by the grace and mercy of God, be granted entrance into heaven. Is the concept of an age of accountability biblical? Is there such a thing as an “age of innocence”?

Frequently lost in the discussion regarding the age of accountability is the fact that children, no matter how young, are not “innocent” in the sense of being sinless. The Bible tells us that, even if an infant or child has not committed personal sin, all people, including infants and children, are guilty before God because of inherited and imputed sin. Inherited sin is that which is passed on from our parents. In Psalm 51:5, David wrote, “Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my mother conceived me.” David recognized that even at conception he was a sinner. The very sad fact that infants sometimes die demonstrates that even infants are impacted by Adam’s sin, since physical and spiritual death were the results of Adam’s original sin.

Each person, infant or adult, stands guilty before God; each person has offended the holiness of God. The only way God can be just and at the same time declare a person righteous is for that person to have received forgiveness by faith in Christ. Christ is the only way. John 14:6 records what Jesus said: “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, except through Me.” Also, Peter states in Acts 4:12, “Salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved.” Salvation is an individual choice.

What about babies and young children who never attain the ability to make this individual choice? The age of accountability is the concept that those who die before reaching the age of accountability are automatically saved by God’s grace and mercy. The age of accountability is the belief that God saves all those who die never having possessed the ability to make a decision for or against Christ. One verse that may speak to this issue is Romans 1:20, “Since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.” According to this, mankind’s guilt before God is based, in part, on the fact that people reject what they can “clearly see” of God’s existence, eternality, and power. This leads to the question of children who have no faculty for “clearly seeing” or reasoning about God—wouldn’t their natural incapacity to observe and reason provide them with an excuse?

Thirteen is the most common age suggested for the age of accountability, based on the Jewish custom that a child becomes an adult at the age of 13. However, the Bible gives no direct support to the age of 13 always being the age of accountability. It likely varies from child to child. A child has passed the age of accountability once he or she is capable of making a faith decision for or against Christ. Charles Spurgeon’s opinion was that “a child of five can as truly be saved and regenerated as an adult.”

With the above in mind, also consider this: Christ’s death is presented as sufficient for all of mankind. First John 2:2 says Jesus is “the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world.” This verse is clear that Jesus’ death was sufficient for all sins, not just the sins of those who specifically have come to Him in faith. The fact that Christ’s death was sufficient for all sin would allow the possibility of God’s applying that payment to those who were never capable of believing.

Some see a link between the age of accountability and the covenant relationship between the nation of Israel and the LORD where no requirement was imposed on a male child to be included in the covenant other than circumcision, which was performed on the eighth day after his birth (Exodus 12:48–50; Leviticus 12:3).

The question arises, “Does the inclusive nature of the Old Covenant apply to the church?” On the day of Pentecost, Peter said, “Repent, and each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. For the promise is for you and your children and for all who are far off, as many as the Lord our God will call to Himself” (Acts 2:38–39, NAS). The word children here (teknon in Greek) means “child, daughter, son.” Acts 2:39 indicates that forgiveness of sins is available to one and all (cf. Acts 1:8), including future generations. It does not teach family or household salvation. The children of those who repented were also required to repent.

The one passage that seems to identify with this topic more than any other is 2 Samuel 12:21–23. The context of these verses is that King David committed adultery with Bathsheba, with a resulting pregnancy. The prophet Nathan was sent by the Lord to inform David that, because of his sin, the Lord would take the child in death. David responded to this by grieving and praying for the child. But once the child was taken, David’s mourning ended. David’s servants were surprised to hear this. They said to King David, “What is this thing that you have done? While the child was alive, you fasted and wept; but when the child died, you arose and ate food.” David’s response was, “While the child was still alive, I fasted and wept; for I said, ‘Who knows, the LORD may be gracious to me, that the child may live.’ But now he has died; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he will not return to me.” David’s response indicates that those who cannot believe are safe in the Lord. David said that he could go to the child but could not bring the child back to him. Also, and just as important, David seemed to be comforted by this knowledge. In other words, David seemed to be saying that he would see his baby son (in heaven), though he could not bring him back.

Although it is possible that God applies Christ’s payment for sin to those who cannot believe, the Bible does not specifically say that He does this. Therefore, this is a subject about which we should not be adamant or dogmatic. God’s applying Christ’s death to those who cannot believe would seem consistent with His love and mercy. It is our position that God applies Christ’s payment for sin to babies and those who are mentally handicapped, since they are not mentally capable of understanding their sinful state and their need for the Savior, but again we cannot be dogmatic. Of this we are certain: God is loving, holy, merciful, just, and gracious. Whatever God does is always right and good, and He loves children even more than we do.
[Reply]
NJChiefsFan27 09:11 AM 06-13-2021
Originally Posted by Chiefshrink:
From this account, we can conclude that infants who die are destined for heaven.
If this were true, being aborted or killed as a child would actually be a good thing for that individual. Children are innocent until they mature and understand the difference between right and wrong. At that point they can be held liable for their actions and beliefs which could doom them to an eternity in hell. Sure, life is a precious thing, but if living out your existence hurts your odds of getting into the kingdom of heaven, wouldn't it be better to have your life cut short before you can develop a moral compass?

If all of this sounds ridiculous it's because it is and Christianity is just a tool used to control gullible people.
[Reply]
Chiefshrink 01:45 PM 06-13-2021
Originally Posted by NJChiefsFan27:
sounds ridiculous it's because it is and Christianity is just a tool used to control gullible people.
I Cor. 1:18-31 -

18 For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

19 For it is written:

“I will destroy the wisdom of the wise;
the intelligence of the intelligent I will frustrate.”

20 Where is the wise person? Where is the teacher of the law? Where is the philosopher of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? 21 For since in the wisdom of God the world through its wisdom did not know him, God was pleased through the foolishness of what was preached to save those who believe. 22 Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, 23 but we preach Christ crucified: a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, 24 but to those whom God has called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. 25 For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than human strength.

26 Brothers and sisters, think of what you were when you were called. Not many of you were wise by human standards; not many were influential; not many were of noble birth. 27 But God chose the foolish things of the world to shame the wise; God chose the weak things of the world to shame the strong. 28 God chose the lowly things of this world and the despised things—and the things that are not—to nullify the things that are, 29 so that no one may boast before him. 30 It is because of him that you are in Christ Jesus, who has become for us wisdom from God—that is, our righteousness, holiness and redemption. 31 Therefore, as it is written: “Let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.”
[Reply]
Marcellus 02:08 PM 06-13-2021
Originally Posted by AdolfOliverBush:
You're only sucking his dick because you happen to agree with much of what he says. His honesty has nothing to do with it.
One of these days you might figure out that what I say I mean. I am being honest unlike your stupid fucking full of shit worthless never contributing a single meaningful thought ass.

Whitlock is honest about his past, his weakness, his beliefs. Only a completely ignorant fool would think otherwise. I don't always and haven't always agreed with him but he is saying what he thinks not some bullshit narrative. What he is constantly saying is unpopular with MOST people on both sides. How you don't get that is amazing but then again you are you.
[Reply]
NJChiefsFan27 11:24 PM 06-13-2021
Originally Posted by Marcellus:
One of these days you might figure out that what I say I mean. I am being honest unlike your stupid ****ing full of shit worthless never contributing a single meaningful thought ass.

Whitlock is honest about his past, his weakness, his beliefs. Only a completely ignorant fool would think otherwise. I don't always and haven't always agreed with him but he is saying what he thinks not some bullshit narrative. What he is constantly saying is unpopular with MOST people on both sides. How you don't get that is amazing but then again you are you.
Every Whitlock post posted here gets all the hillbillies here excited. What are you talking about? Show me some examples of him writing something that was unpopular with conservatives from the last few years.
[Reply]
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