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Patteeu Memorial Political Forum>*****Official George Floyd/MPLS Police dep trial*****
displacedinMN 09:47 AM 01-12-2021
Under Special Request-Shortened to help out

What happened -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_George_Floyd

Results and riots https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd_protests

Trials-Latest

Spoiler!



Charges
Spoiler!


I will update things as I can-I have full RedStarTrib access.

Live tweets from Red Star http://live.startribune.com/Event/Li...rial_testimony

KARE 11 Live Stream with experts. https://www.kare11.com/watch?vid=5b7...b-8073ea5b7450
[Reply]
Just Passin' By 07:15 PM 05-05-2021
Originally Posted by notorious:
You guys are kidding yourself if you think this guy will get punished.

He will be celebrated.
I don't care if he's celebrated. I only care that the defendant gets a fair trial, which he didn't the first time.
[Reply]
ChiTown 08:30 AM 05-07-2021
and here we go....

https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/four-...s-death-george

Four Former Minneapolis Police Officers Indicted on Federal Civil Rights Charges for Death of George Floyd; Derek Chauvin Also Charged in Separate Indictment for Violating Civil Rights of a Juvenile


WASHINGTON — A federal grand jury in Minneapolis, Minnesota, returned two indictments that were unsealed today. The first indictment charges former Minneapolis Police Department officers Derek Chauvin, 45; Tou Thao, 35; J. Alexander Kueng, 27; and Thomas Lane, 38, with federal civil rights crimes for their roles in the death of George Perry Floyd Jr.

The three-count indictment alleges that all four defendants, while acting under color of law, willfully deprived Mr. Floyd of his constitutional rights, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 242. Specifically, Count One of the indictment alleges that on May 25, 2020, Chauvin held his left knee across Mr. Floyd’s neck, and his right knee on Floyd’s back and arm, as George Floyd lay on the ground, handcuffed and unresisting, and kept his knees on Mr. Floyd’s neck and body even after Mr. Floyd became unresponsive. The indictment alleges that Chauvin’s actions violated Mr. Floyd’s constitutional right to be free from the use of unreasonable force by a police officer and resulted in bodily injury to, and the death of, Mr. Floyd.

Count Two of the indictment charges that Thao and Kueng willfully failed to intervene to stop Chauvin’s use of unreasonable force, resulting in bodily injury to, and the death of, Mr. Floyd. Finally, Count Three of the indictment alleges that all four defendants saw Mr. Floyd lying on the ground in clear need of medical care and willfully failed to aid him. The indictment alleges that by doing so, all four defendants willfully deprived Mr. Floyd of his constitutional right not to be deprived of liberty without due process of law, which includes an arrestee’s right to be free from a police officer’s deliberate indifference to his serious medical needs. The indictment alleges that this offense resulted in bodily injury to, and the death of, Mr. Floyd.

A separate, two-count indictment also charges Chauvin with willfully depriving a Minneapolis resident who was then fourteen-years-old of the constitutional right to be free from the use of unreasonable force by a police officer, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 242. Count One of this indictment alleges that on Sept. 4, 2017, Chauvin, without legal justification, held the teenager by the throat and struck the teenager multiple times in the head with a flashlight. The indictment alleges that this offense included the use of a dangerous weapon—a flashlight—and resulted in bodily injury to the teenager. Count Two of the indictment charges that Chauvin held his knee on the neck and the upper back of the teenager even after the teenager was lying prone, handcuffed, and unresisting, also resulting in bodily injury.

Both indictments charge violations of Title 18, United States Code, Section 242. 18 U.S.C. § 242 states that it is a crime for an official acting under color of law to willfully violate a person’s constitutional rights. If government employees, like police officers, use or misuse the power provided to them by their position, they are acting “under color of law.”

An indictment is merely a formal accusation of criminal conduct. The defendants are presumed innocent unless and until they are proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

The charges announced today are separate from the Justice Department’s civil pattern or practice investigation into the City of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department that the Attorney General announced on April 21. The charges announced today are criminal, while the pattern or practice investigation is a civil investigation that will be conducted separately and independently from the criminal case, and will be handled by a different team of career staff from the Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

The charges announced today are also separate from, and in addition to, the charges the State of Minnesota has brought against these former officers related to the death of Mr. Floyd. The federal charges allege different criminal offenses; specifically, they allege violations of the U.S. Constitution, rather than of state law.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Pamela S. Karlan and Acting U.S. Attorney W. Anders Folk for the District of Minnesota commend the investigative efforts of the FBI and the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension in this matter, and thank the Minneapolis Police Department for its cooperation in the investigation.

The federal criminal cases are being prosecuted by Acting U.S. Attorney W. Anders Folk of the District of Minnesota, Special Litigation Counsel Samantha Trepel and Trial Attorney Tara Allison of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Samantha Bates, LeeAnn Bell, Evan Gilead, Manda Sertich and Allen Slaughter of the District of Minnesota.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 10:03 AM 05-07-2021
keep digging until they are buried
ugh
[Reply]
vailpass 11:08 AM 05-07-2021
Keith Ellison. Nice job MN.
[Reply]
BigRichard 12:10 PM 05-07-2021
Reap what you sow... reap what you sow.
[Reply]
GloryDayz 07:42 PM 05-07-2021
At some point we'll hear complaints about police not responding to calls made in certain parts of town.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 07:54 PM 05-07-2021
Originally Posted by GloryDayz:
At some point we'll hear complaints about police not responding to calls made in certain parts of town.
already happening in MPLS. Main is inside GF zone.

It needs to be torn down.

would not surprise me if response times are way high-there are just not enough officers to go around.
[Reply]
Bob Dole 07:56 PM 05-07-2021
Originally Posted by Just Passin' By:
I don't care if he's celebrated. I only care that the defendant gets a fair trial, which he didn't the first time.
Can he get a burnt out section of town named after him?
[Reply]
GloryDayz 08:42 PM 05-07-2021
Originally Posted by displacedinMN:
already happening in MPLS. Main is inside GF zone.

It needs to be torn down.

would not surprise me if response times are way high-there are just not enough officers to go around.
Good. That area deserves to go without anybody enforcing the law.
[Reply]
Just Passin' By 01:34 AM 05-08-2021
Originally Posted by Bob Dole:
Can he get a burnt out section of town named after him?
How about the precinct building that the mayor let burn?
[Reply]
Shields68 07:39 AM 05-08-2021
Originally Posted by Just Passin' By:
How about the precinct building that the mayor let burn?
But Jan 6th was the worse attack....
[Reply]
displacedinMN 09:17 AM 05-10-2021
MPLS returns to normal

MINNEAPOLIS — A woman was killed and a man was injured in a Saturday night shooting in downtown Minneapolis, police said. It was one of several shootings to occur throughout the night across the city.

According to Minneapolis Police Department spokesperson John Elder, officers responded to the area of 9th Street South and LaSalle at 10:22 p.m. after 911 callers reported hearing gunshots.

On the way, they were told that a man appeared to be lying on 9th Street South between LaSalle and Hennepin avenues. Elder said police arrived and found the man. He had been shot, but his injuries weren't life-threatening. He was taken to the hospital via ambulance.

Other officers at the scene found a woman dead on the 9th Street and LaSalle parking ramp. It's the city's 26th homicide this year.

According to Elder, the suspect fled before police arrived. Police have conducted interviews with people who may have been in the area during the shooting, but no one is in custody.

Earlier in the night, police say two people arrived at North Memorial Medical Center after a shooting just after 7:30 p.m. near the 4200 block of Webber Parkway.

Just before 3:30 a.m. Sunday, officers responded to a report of shots fired at a party in the area of the 2100 block of West Broadway. When officers arrived, they found a man inside a building with an apparent gunshot wound. He was transported to North Memorial and is in critical condition, according to police.

Authorities say shortly after the man arrived at the hospital, another man was dropped off at North Memorial with a gunshot wound that officials say wasn't life threatening. Within an hour of the shooting, a woman was dropped off at Methodist Hospital after being shot. Police say her injury is believed to be non life-threatening as well.

It's unclear if there if any of the shootings are connected.

On Sunday, KARE 11 spoke to Spike Moss, who calls himself a "Freedom Fighter against gang violence."

At this time it's unclear if the shootings were gang-related, but Moss says if we want to change gun violence we need to look inside the home and get rid of the snitching mentality.

"The police don't know that you're in your mother, girlfriend's house talking about hurting somebody, they don't know you're there talking about killing somebody. They don't know the moment you leave and where you're going, so we need to stop dropping it at their doorstep and pick up our responsibility for our own sons and our own daughters," Spike said.

Spike has held gang summits all around the country and will hold the summits inside churches.

"One of the things we still have in our favor is we have great pastors and this is a spiritual war," Spike said.

Moss says he is working with Gov. Tim Walz to organize a summit highlighting gang violence in Minnesota. He says he hopes it will take place soon and said we need to continue having these conversations.
[Reply]
Prison Bitch 11:45 AM 05-11-2021

[Reply]
Eureka 12:51 PM 05-11-2021
Originally Posted by Bob Dole:
Can he get a burnt out section of town named after him?
LOL. When you point out the obvious.

This square has been named after GF. Please, don't go there past sunset or else.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 08:33 AM 05-12-2021
At some point, we are going to have to admit that Chauvin is being blamed for every civil rights issue over the last 50 years and GF never has to take responsibility for his actions.


MINNEAPOLIS — A Minnesota judge has ruled that there were aggravating factors in the death of George Floyd, paving the way for a longer sentence for Derek Chauvin, according to an order made public Wednesday.

In his ruling, Judge Peter Cahill found that Chauvin abused his authority as a police officer when he restrained Floyd last year, and that he treated Floyd with particular cruelty.

Still even with the aggravating factors, legal experts have said, Chauvin is unlikely to get more than 30 years when he is sentenced June 25.

Chauvin, who is white, was convicted in April of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for pressing his knee against Floyd's neck for 9 1/2 minutes as the Black man said he couldn't breathe and went motionless.

Even though he was found guilty of three counts, under Minnesota statutes he'll only be sentenced on the most serious one — second-degree murder. Under Minnesota sentencing guidelines, he would have faced a presumptive sentence of 12 1/2 years on that count, and Cahill could have sentenced him to as little as 10 years and eight months or as much as 15 years and still stayed within the guideline range.

But prosecutors asked for what is known as an upward departure — arguing that Floyd was particularly vulnerable with his hands cuffed behind his back as he was face-down on the ground. They noted that Chauvin held his position even after Floyd became unresponsive and officers knew he had no pulse.

Prosecutors also said Chauvin treated Floyd with particular cruelty during the lengthy restraint, saying Chauvin inflicted gratuitous pain and caused psychological distress to Floyd and to bystanders. They also said Chauvin abused his position of authority as a police officer, committed his crime as part of a group of three or more people, and that he pinned Floyd down in the presence of children — including a 9-year-old girl who testified at trial that watching the restraint made her "sad and kind of mad."

Cahill agreed with all but one of the prosecutors' arguments. He said prosecutors did not prove that Floyd was particularly vulnerable.

Defense attorney Eric Nelson disagreed with the state, saying that prosecutors did not prove that there were aggravating factors. He said Chauvin had legal authority to assist in Floyd's arrest and was authorized under law to use reasonable force. He also said Floyd was not particularly vulnerable, saying he was a large man who was struggling with officers.

Nelson also argued Floyd was not treated with particular cruelty, saying that there is no evidence that the assault perpetrated by Chauvin involved gratuitous pain that's not usually associated with second-degree murder.

No matter what sentence Chauvin gets, in Minnesota it's presumed that a defendant with good behavior will serve two-thirds of the penalty in prison and the rest on supervised release, commonly known as parole.

Chauvin has also been indicted on federal charges alleging he violated Floyd's civil rights, as well as the civil rights of a 14-year-old he restrained in a 2017 arrest. If convicted on those charges, which were unsealed Friday, a federal sentence would be served at the same time as Chauvin's state sentence. The three other former officers involved in Floyd's death were also charged with federal civil rights violations; they await trial in state court on aiding and abetting counts.
[Reply]
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