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Patteeu Memorial Political Forum>*****Official George Floyd/MPLS Police dep trial*****
displacedinMN 09:47 AM 01-12-2021
Under Special Request-Shortened to help out

What happened -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_George_Floyd

Results and riots https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd_protests

Trials-Latest

Spoiler!



Charges
Spoiler!


I will update things as I can-I have full RedStarTrib access.

Live tweets from Red Star http://live.startribune.com/Event/Li...rial_testimony

KARE 11 Live Stream with experts. https://www.kare11.com/watch?vid=5b7...b-8073ea5b7450
[Reply]
ChiTown 10:13 AM 04-29-2021
Originally Posted by eDave:
Doesn't mean that wasn't an issue. Didn't even need to draw it into the trial as the evidence spoke for itself.
I'm still waiting for the evidence that the George Floyd incident was racially motivated.
[Reply]
rabblerouser 10:52 AM 04-29-2021
Originally Posted by BucEyedPea:
Jesse Jackson was a master at this.
Anything to keep Black America satiated enough with him to keep them from looking too deep into his actions surrounding the MLK hit.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 09:06 PM 04-29-2021
Federal prosecutors plan to ask a grand jury to indict the four former Minneapolis police officers involved in the fatal arrest of George Floyd on charges of civil rights violations, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Minneapolis declined to comment on the matter to 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS.

The officers' attorneys who did reply to 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS declined to comment.

A federal grand jury size can be up to 23 randomly selected people, who are called from across Minnesota for six months of service and can then be recalled for longer.



Hennepin County Jail
A grand jury does not convict someone of a crime but instead is asked to determine if a person should face criminal charges.

"One thing to understand is that it's a limited process," former federal prosecutor Mark Osler said. "The prosecutor is there, the grand jury is there, court reporter there, there's no defense attorney and no judge, so the prosecutor really runs the show."

If a grand jury decides that the evidence presented establishes probable cause, it issues an indictment against the accused, according to the Department of Justice website, which can then lead to an arrest and a court date.

"The prosecutor will actually draft the indictment, bring it into the grand jury and ask them to sign off on it," Osler said.

5 EYEWITNESS NEWS asked Osler what federal civil rights violations could possibly encompass.

"A public official under the color of law, in this case wearing the badge, who goes beyond the bounds of what's acceptable behavior and violates the civil rights,” Osler said. “Our civil rights include not to be assaulted by a government official.”
[Reply]
eDave 09:07 PM 04-29-2021
Originally Posted by ChiTown:
I'm still waiting for the evidence that the George Floyd incident was racially motivated.
Have they charged him? When they fo, we will most likely know then or during trial.
[Reply]
Fishpicker 10:58 PM 04-29-2021
Originally Posted by rabblerouser:
Anything to keep Black America satiated enough with him to keep them from looking too deep into his actions surrounding the MLK hit.
and his acting as a FBI informant against Bloods after purchasing cocaine
[Reply]
Deberg_1990 02:17 PM 04-30-2021
People makin that money off of Floyd. Wow


@ScoonTv , prime example of those benefiting from the deaths of those killed by officers. The grift is real. https://t.co/wBjC9irZDG

— That1dude (@That1dude247) April 30, 2021

[Reply]
alpha_omega 02:43 PM 04-30-2021
Holy cow...almost 700K???
[Reply]
displacedinMN 02:54 PM 04-30-2021
Originally Posted by Deberg_1990:
People makin that money off of Floyd. Wow



. A CHILD paid the price of her innocence, her well-being, her hope, so that white people would start to wake the f-$& up. And people are going out of their way to break her spirit?!

700K would go a long way in helping anyone find peace
[Reply]
Eureka 05:03 PM 04-30-2021
Originally Posted by displacedinMN:
. A CHILD paid the price of her innocence, her well-being, her hope, so that white people would start to wake the f-$& up. And people are going out of their way to break her spirit?!

700K would go a long way in helping anyone find peace
I'm contributing 20% of all the money I earn working grave yard security on the George Floyd square.
[Reply]
Shields68 03:10 PM 05-03-2021
Probably going to have some interesting motions in this case. Think his chances of getting this trial overturned may jump significantly if shown that a juror lied.

https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2021/05...-shirt-n387403
[Reply]
ChiTown 03:17 PM 05-03-2021
Originally Posted by Deberg_1990:
People makin that money off of Floyd. Wow


Just goes to show you, a fool and their money are soon parted. What a World we live in! LOL
[Reply]
displacedinMN 05:24 PM 05-03-2021
Powerful painkiller fentanyl a factor in many overdose deaths


The COVID-19 pandemic helped fuel a 27% increase in drug overdose deaths in Minnesota last year.

Overdose fatalities reached 1,008 in 2020, with the first large increase coming in March as the state saw its first coronavirus cases and deaths, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.

The onset of a previously unknown virus that had already taken many lives across the world led many treatment and outreach resources to abruptly shut down, limiting access and support to those with substance use disorders.

"With COVID there's this terrible storm about lack of access to treatment medications, housing and treatment facilities," said Dr. Ryan Kelly, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School. "It made it more difficult to access those things and people died because of that."

Drug-related deaths increased 64% in March 2020 compared with the previous year and then peaked at over 100 fatalities in the months of May and August.

Even before the pandemic, America was in the throes of a drug overdose crisis, including an increasing and more dangerous illicit drug supply and a lack of mental health treatment and supportive services, according to treatment advocates and family members.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 05:28 PM 05-03-2021
.
Originally Posted by Shields68:
Probably going to have some interesting motions in this case. Think his chances of getting this trial overturned may jump significantly if shown that a juror lied.

https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2021/05...-shirt-n387403


Originally Posted by :
Brandon Mitchell, a juror in the Derek Chauvin trial for the death of George Floyd, spoke about his experience last week.
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A juror in the Derek Chauvin murder trial is defending his attendance at the March on Washington anniversary last summer in light of online speculation about his motives on the jury.

In recent days, a photo of Brandon Mitchell that was originally posted on social media around the Aug. 28 event commemorating Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech began circulating online and on multiple news sites. Many commentators online questioned his motive and its potential to fuel an appeal in Chauvin's case.

Mitchell, who is Black, was one of 12 jurors who convicted Chauvin two weeks ago on all counts against him — second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter — in the May 25 killing of George Floyd, who is also Black. Mitchell was the first juror to go public about his role, and spoke to several media outlets last week.

"I'd never been to [Washington] D.C.," Mitchell said Monday of his reasons for attending the event. "The opportunity to go to D.C., the opportunity to be around thousands and thousands of Black people; I just thought it was a good opportunity to be a part of something."

Chauvin's attorney, Eric Nelson, did not return a message seeking comment.

The matter is likely to be cited by Nelson as one of many bases for an appeal, said a law professor and defense attorney.

"If [Mitchell] specifically was asked, 'Have you ever participated in a Black Lives Matter demonstration,' and he answered, 'No,' to that, I think that would be an important appealable issue," said Joseph Daly, emeritus professor at Mitchell Hamline School of Law.

The picture shows Mitchell, 31, standing next to two cousins in Washington D.C. He is wearing a Black T-shirt with a picture of King surrounded by the words, "GET YOUR KNEE OFF OUR NECKS" and "BLM" (Black Lives Matter). Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck for nine minutes and 29 seconds.


Mitchell said the social media post was made by his uncle, who is the father of one of the cousins pictured, and appears to be "a partial real post." However, he said, he has no recollection of wearing or owning the shirt.

Mitchell said the event was commemorating the 57th anniversary of King's famous speech, which advocated for civil and economic rights for Blacks, and is credited with helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The event was "100% not" a march for Floyd, Mitchell said, adding, "It was directly related to MLK's March on Washington from the '60s … The date of the March on Washington is the date."

The event had several components, including: advocating for racial justice, increasing voter registration, pushing for a new version of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and urging participation in the 2020 census.

It also focused on police use-of-force. Floyd's brother and sister, Philonise and Bridgett Floyd, and family members of others who have been shot by police addressed the crowd. It served as a rallying point for the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, a federal police reform bill.

Mitchell said he answered "no" to two questions in the juror questionnaire sent out before jury selection that asked about participation in demonstrations.

The first question asked, "Did you, or someone close to you, participate in any of the demonstrations or marches against police brutality that took place in Minneapolis after George Floyd's death?"

The second asked, "Other than what you have already described above, have you, or anyone close to you, participated in protests about police use of force or police brutality?"


Mitchell said he was not concerned about backlash for his participation in the march, noting its historic significance beyond the Chauvin case.

"This was a big deal," he said of the event. "It's a national thing."

Mitchell took issue with at least one news account of the picture that said he told the court during jury selection that he had no knowledge of Chauvin's case.

"I think I was being extremely honest, for sure," he said of the jury selection process. "I gave my views on everything — on the case, on Black Lives Matter."

Nelson asked Mitchell several questions during jury selection, and Mitchell told him: He had watched clips of bystander video of the incident; he had talked about the case with his family, friends and co-workers; he had wondered why three other officers at the scene didn't stop Chauvin; and he had a "very favorable" opinion of Black Lives Matter.

Mitchell also told Nelson he knew some police officers at his gym who were "great guys," and that he felt neutral about Blue Lives Matter, a pro-police group. He said he could be neutral at trial.

Defense attorney Mike Padden, who is not involved in the case, said Mitchell should have divulged his participation and let attorneys and the judge decide whether it would unfairly influence him at trial.

"It's disconcerting," Padden said. "Maybe with that disclosure, Mr. Nelson keeps him on the jury, but I don't think so."

Padden said had he been in Nelson's shoes and known about the march in conjunction with Mitchell's answer about BLM, he would have asked the court to dismiss him from the jury pool, and were that denied by the judge, he would have used a peremptory strike to dismiss him.

It's the attorneys' jobs to home in on issues and ferret out more detailed answers, said Daly, who praised Nelson's trial performance.

"You don't have to, as a potential juror, go to confession," Daly said. "It's not like you're opening up your entire life and everything you've ever done that may or may not relate to this case. It's the job of the lawyers to look for and find unbiased jurors."

The issue's strength on appeal, Daly said, rests on whether the court believes Mitchell lied in his questionnaire or during jury selection, which is a crime.

Chao Xiong • 612-270-4708

[Reply]
|Zach| 05:51 PM 05-03-2021
Originally Posted by banyon:
I guess you have to see enough juries fall for it. Now in hindsight, of course, it looks like it certainly couldn't have hurt anything.

I am really curious if there were prior use of force complaints that would have come into play, because that's the main reason to keep him off the stand IMO.
Hard to tell how much credit you give to a “complaint” when anyone can complain and accuse cops of the wildest thing with no basis. That’s why body cams are so valuable.

There does seem to be some problematic things here but it’s tough to tell with info the public has access to.

https://news.yahoo.com/know-18-compl...200000682.html
[Reply]
BucEyedPea 10:11 AM 05-04-2021
Is that the same guy I saw live on TV who said they (blacks) need to get on more juries so they can change things?

If so, boy does that reek of not just bias, but his motivation for being on the jury.
Same thing happened in the Stone trial where the jury foreperson had a social media full of anti-Trump tweets.


Get Your Knee Off Our Necks huh.

[Reply]
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