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Patteeu Memorial Political Forum>Are you going to take the vaccine?
GloryDayz 08:48 AM 12-01-2020
I know I'm going to try to be first in line, but what about the rest of you? I'm not sure if the death count is where the science community wants it to be, plus Birdbrain hasn't been sworn in, so I expect there will be delays, but that's beside the point.

You can be honest.
[Reply]
Braincase 09:59 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by MahomesMagic:
https://www.ncbi.:-).nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7184402/
Coronavirus Occurrence and Transmission Over 8 Years in the HIVE Cohort of Households in Michigan
Arnold S Monto, Peter M DeJonge, Amy P Callear, Latifa A Bazzi, Skylar B Capriola, Ryan E Malosh, Emily T Martin, and Joshua G Petrie
Ah... so as the weather gets colder, and we gather together indoors, increasing the population density in a confined space, viruses have a higher transmission rate.

Interesting.

Good find.
[Reply]
MahomesMagic 09:59 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by Donger:
Wow, you actually posted that to prove me wrong?

:-)

It's not a caveat, you turd:

The study authors say it is not possible to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which causes COVID-19 disease, will behave likewise. But they hope their findings will help investigators better prepare for what's to come during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their study appears in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

"Even though the seasonal coronaviruses found in Michigan are related to SARS-CoV-2, we do not know whether that virus will behave like the seasonal coronaviruses," said Arnold Monto


And:

When year-round surveillance occurred, most coronavirus cases were detected between December and April/May, and peaked in January/February. Only 2.5% of the cases occurred between June and September.

Tell me, moron: Did that happen in 2020 or 2021? We had no summer surge(s)?

Yes, we did.

:-)

Way to step on a self-laid landmine, Skippy.


Lay out the charts for NY and prove this wrong. You're a moron who thinks you're special because you are a grown man who is scared like a little kid of a virus that likely would do nothing to you.


"Cases"? Cases where? Florida and the SE are in a different climate zone.
[Reply]
Donger 10:02 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by MahomesMagic:
Lay out the charts for NY and prove this wrong. You're a moron who thinks you're special because you are a grown man who is scared like a little kid of a virus that likely would do nothing to you.


"Cases"? Cases where? Florida and the SE are in a different climate zone.
Prove what wrong, numb nuts? That COVID-19 doesn't follow influenza's seasonality (i.e., it basically disappears during our summer) like you claimed it does? You already did yourself that by posting that link, you fup:

Only 2.5% of the cases occurred between June and September.


:-)
[Reply]
MahomesMagic 10:03 AM 12-18-2021

Michigan COVID Update: 12/4/21

Uncanny. pic.twitter.com/39mEsn4xcq

— Hold2 (@Hold2LLC) December 4, 2021



This will be obvious to anyone not in the Corona Cult.


Look at 2020 and 2021 superimposed on a chart. Notice anything?!
[Reply]
Braincase 10:04 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by BucEyedPea:
That's not what I am commenting on. You put up a wall of listings (text) and tell the person who you dispute to do a massive amount of work. It's lazy and just deflection.

You can't put up a document you know about because you don't know which one backs you. Likely because you haven't read any but just follow Legacy Media or worse NPR. In other words, you got nuthin'. Just belief.

That's why your attempt is worth a hearty laugh.
I read half a dozen of them, but knew that if I posted a couple I would likely get accused of cherry-picking my results, that's why I posted a simple query and all of the results.

If you would like for me to pick a few out, I can, but I doubt it would be good use of my time.
[Reply]
MahomesMagic 10:05 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by Braincase:
I read half a dozen of them, but knew that if I posted a couple I would likely get accused of cherry-picking my results, that's why I posted a simple query and all of the results.

If you would like for me to pick a few out, I can, but I doubt it would be good use of my time.
People aren't going to do the work for you.

If you throw out half-baked silly ideas you need to defend them, not our job.
[Reply]
BucEyedPea 10:06 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by Braincase:
I read half a dozen of them, but knew that if I posted a couple I would likely get accused of cherry-picking my results, that's why I posted a simple query and all of the results.
Then cite the parts you're applying. Again—lazy.

Originally Posted by :
If you would like for me to pick a few out, I can, but I doubt it would be good use of my time.
Same applies to any documents or experts we use. I've used the Lancet and some credible vaccine creators.
[Reply]
Donger 10:07 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by MahomesMagic:
If you throw out half-baked silly ideas you need to defend them, not our job.

It's seasonal you moron.


:-)
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MahomesMagic 10:07 AM 12-18-2021
Hope-Simpson wrote a book on this decades ago.

And look here...matches.


Come on, man!@covidtweets @districtai @TheLawyerCraig @alexbussani pic.twitter.com/XR8HGqYU2Y

— Hold2 (@Hold2LLC) December 16, 2021

[Reply]
Braincase 10:09 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by MahomesMagic:
People aren't going to do the work for you.

If you throw out half-baked silly ideas you need to defend them, not our job.
OK.
****
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22N2ZS

"WHAT INFLUENCES THE CORONAVIRUS REPRODUCTION RATE?
Population density is a major factor. The virus spreads much more efficiently in densely populated areas. Mitigation efforts, such as social distancing, school and business closures, and wearing of face masks all help drive the RO number down."
****

You should write a strongly worded letter to Reuters. They apparently aren't using their brains .
[Reply]
MahomesMagic 10:09 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by Donger:

It's seasonal you moron.


:-)
I know your religion the peaks and valleys are all based on how many humans bought into your religion.


Sorry, I am not interested in joining your Cult.

:-)
[Reply]
Braincase 10:11 AM 12-18-2021
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3286...r%20of%20cases.

"Also, the population, population density of the provinces, and average air pollution data were taken. The findings of the study showed that population density and wind were effective in spreading the virus and both factors explained for 94% of the variance in virus spreading. "
[Reply]
Donger 10:11 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by MahomesMagic:
I know your religion the peaks and valleys are all based on how many humans bought into your religion.


Sorry, I am not interested in joining your Cult.

:-)
https://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/show...ostcount=21799

:-)
[Reply]
MahomesMagic 10:12 AM 12-18-2021
Originally Posted by Braincase:
OK.
****
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22N2ZS

"WHAT INFLUENCES THE CORONAVIRUS REPRODUCTION RATE?
Population density is a major factor. The virus spreads much more efficiently in densely populated areas. Mitigation efforts, such as social distancing, school and business closures, and wearing of face masks all help drive the RO number down."
****

You should write a strongly worded letter to Reuters. They apparently aren't using their brains .
That would not even be a good article for children to read.

Lots of misinformation and zero science.

Mitigation efforts, such as social distancing, school and business closures, and wearing of face masks all help drive the RO number down.


Reads like Chinese State propaganda.

:-)
[Reply]
Braincase 10:13 AM 12-18-2021
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0242398

"Most models developed to predict the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. do not include population density explicitly. This study shows that population density is an effective predictor of cumulative infection cases in the U.S. at the county level. Daily cumulative cases by counties are converted into 7-day moving averages. Treating the weekly averages as the dependent variable and the county population density levels as the explanatory variable, both in logarithmic scale, this study assesses how population density has shaped the distributions of infection cases across the U.S. from early March to late May, 2020. "|



"However, distancing is also behavioral. Although high-density environments make distancing more challenging, smart human behaviors may reduce the detrimental effects of high density in the epidemic setting, but ignorant behaviors may amplify damages. People living in high-density environments such as inner cities and major urban centers need to be constantly reminded what to avoid and why. Another major finding in the current study confirms the significant contributions of older adult, African American and Hispanic-Latina population sizes toward infection cases. The presence of these three population subgroups together with a high-density environment could have a synergetic effect on infection spread. Local communities or geographic regions possessing these characteristics should enforce distancing policies stringently and closely monitor for potential outbreaks.

Density matters, and so are the presences of the more vulnerable population subgroups in influencing the impacts of the epidemic. Results reported here calls for the considerations of these factors in developing prediction and assessment models. In addition, these factors can also facilitate the development of models with higher spatial resolutions to predict local sub-county level situations."
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