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Media Center>Science Fiction and Fantasy Books Only Thread
Buck 07:05 PM 03-20-2012
There is a great thread in the lounge about Books in general, but to be honest, all I really want to read is Sci-Fi (including post-apocalyptic), and Fantasy.

In this OP I will compile every poster's top 3 Fantasy/SciFi suggestions if they give me them. I will try to keep the posters in alphabetical order in case you want to find someone's suggestions easier.

CP POSTER SUGGESTIONS

Baby Lee
1. Fritz Lieber's Swords Against series.
2. George R.R. Martin's SoIaF series [no brainer that will probably make tons of other lists]
3. Umberto Eco, Foucalt's Pendulum [a little more obscure/forgotten to make up for GRRM]

Frosty
1.Raymond Feist - Riftwar Saga
2.Terry Brooks - Shannara series (starting with the Knight of the Word books)
3.Tad Williams - Memory, Sorrow and Thorn

Huffmeister
(1) Dune - Frank Herbert
(2) The Stand - Stephen King (1000+ page unabridged)
(3) Starship Troopers - Robert A. Heinlein (checkout the song by Yes, too. lots of great bass)

Jawshco
1. "Book of the Long Sun" by Gene Wolfe
2. "Paradise War" by Stephen R Lawhead
3. "The Dragonbone Chair" by Tad Williams

listopencil
1. Edgar Rice Burroughs, any series
2. Robert Heinlein, everything he has written in chronological order (but read Starship Troopers first)
3. Doc Smith's Lensman series

vailpass
1. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume 1, 2A & 2B books are a gold mine for sampling the evolution of sci-fi. (below)
2.The Nebula Awards and Hugo Awards (selected yearly, pick a year)
3. Years Best SF Annual publication, pick any volume from 1 to the current volume 17
See Post 142
[Reply]
ChiefFripp 07:32 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
I highly recommend a couple of books by "the dean of science fiction", Robert A. Heinlein: Methuselah's Children and Starship Troopers. If you decide you like Heinlein, there are many more.
The Number of The Beast is good.
[Reply]
whoman69 07:32 PM 03-21-2012
I used to read more science fiction, but the last 25 years or so have only read fantasy.

Best of the field David and Leigh Eddings.

The Belgariad series
Pawn of Prophecy (1982)
Queen of Sorcery (1982)
Magician's Gambit (1983)
Castle of Wizardry (1984)
Enchanters' End Game (1984)
The Malloreon series
Guardians of the West (1987)
King of the Murgos (1988)
Demon Lord of Karanda (1988)
Sorceress of Darshiva (1989)
The Seeress of Kell (1991)
[edit] Books related to The Belgariad and The Malloreon
Belgarath the Sorcerer (1995) (Prequel) with Leigh Eddings
Polgara the Sorceress (1997) (Prequel) with Leigh Eddings

The Elenium series
The Diamond Throne (1989)
The Ruby Knight (1990)
The Sapphire Rose (1991)
The Tamuli series
Domes of Fire (1992)
The Shining Ones (1993)
The Hidden City (1994)
[Reply]
Lex Luthor 08:07 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by listopencil:
I'd recommend "The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress", and "Time Enough For Love" rather than "Methuselah's Children". And then I'd recommend that you read every book he wrote anyway.
Since "Time Enough For Love" is a sequel to "Methuselah's Children", I thought it made more sense to recommend the book that came first. However, I agree that both of the books you mentioned are excellent.

I've read every book Heinlein wrote, most of them several times. It's too bad he went senile in his old age and published such crap right before he died. Based upon his obsession with incest and the way he insisted upon justifying it in several of his later books, I think it's a very good thing he didn't have any daughters.
[Reply]
Lex Luthor 08:12 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by ChiefFripp:
The Number of The Beast is good.
That's funny. I thought that was one of the worst books he ever wrote, and that's one of the few Heinlein books that I only read one time. It started out very good, but it seemed like about two-thirds of the way through it he forgot what the story was about, so he decided to just abruptly end the book with a party in which the guests were the characters from his earlier books.

I thought the guy had gone senile, and I couldn't believe any publisher would publish it.
[Reply]
ChiefFripp 08:16 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
That's funny. I thought that was one of the worst books he ever wrote, and that's one of the few Heinlein books that I only read one time. It started out very good, but it seemed like about two-thirds of the way through it he forgot what the story was about, so he decided to just abruptly end the book with a party in which the guests were the characters from his earlier books.

I thought the guy had gone senile, and I couldn't believe any publisher would publish it.
Yeah maybe you're correct. I DO remember liking the book but being confused by the ending.
[Reply]
Braincase 08:17 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Buck:
I can't disagree with you on the hard sci-fi trend of current sci-fi.

All of my favorites were written in the 90s or earlier. A lot of those classics hold up very well today.

I Am Legend was written in the 70s I think. I'm currently reading it. It should take me one more day at most to finish. I think its great and it's not hard sci-fi at all.

Then again maybe some people don't include post-apoc in sci-fi, but I do.

I do have a little bit of me that wants some hard sci-fi, but I will always enjoy character-driven pieces more.
I am Legend dates to the 50's. It has been made into a movie at least three times, once featuring Vincent Price as the Last Man on Earth, Charlton Heston in "The Omega Man", and of course most recently with Will Smith in "I am Legend".
[Reply]
Buck 08:17 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
That's funny. I thought that was one of the worst books he ever wrote, and that's one of the few Heinlein books that I only read one time. It started out very good, but it seemed like about two-thirds of the way through it he forgot what the story was about, so he decided to just abruptly end the book with a party in which the guests were the characters from his earlier books.

I thought the guy had gone senile, and I couldn't believe any publisher would publish it.
Sounds like every Kurt Vonnegut book.
[Reply]
Baby Lee 08:27 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
Since "Time Enough For Love" is a sequel to "Methuselah's Children", I thought it made more sense to recommend the book that came first. However, I agree that both of the books you mentioned are excellent.

I've read every book Heinlein wrote, most of them several times. It's too bad he went senile in his old age and published such crap right before he died. Based upon his obsession with incest and the way he insisted upon justifying it in several of his later books, I think it's a very good thing he didn't have any daughters.
Have you read JOB: A Comedy of Justice?

I have it in paperback, but it's coming apart at the spine. I've wanted to read it, but didn't know if it would be worth the effort of dealing with a disintegrating book.
[Reply]
keg in kc 08:27 PM 03-21-2012
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is a great book. I'd forgotten about that one. Might be time for a re-read.
[Reply]
Lex Luthor 08:59 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Baby Lee:
Have you read JOB: A Comedy of Justice?

I have it in paperback, but it's coming apart at the spine. I've wanted to read it, but didn't know if it would be worth the effort of dealing with a disintegrating book.
Yes, I read it several years ago. In my opinion it wasn't great, but it wasn't terrible either.

Probably one of my favorites is The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag. I still remember one line in the book that made chills run down my spine when I read it. I won't give it away here, but I highly recommend the book.
[Reply]
listopencil 09:00 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
Since "Time Enough For Love" is a sequel to "Methuselah's Children", I thought it made more sense to recommend the book that came first. However, I agree that both of the books you mentioned are excellent.

I've read every book Heinlein wrote, most of them several times. It's too bad he went senile in his old age and published such crap right before he died. Based upon his obsession with incest and the way he insisted upon justifying it in several of his later books, I think it's a very good thing he didn't have any daughters.
Yeah, seemed to me that the time he spent bedridden caused him to overthink his morals. He might have been just pushing the envelope but there were some strong incestuous themes in his work. Just take a look at Farnham's Freehold.

I've read them all too. I remember when Friday came out and my dad said to me, "The old guy still has it." I'd say Friday was the best of his last work. I wouldn't call the rest of his last work crap but yeah, there was a noticeable drop off.
[Reply]
JD10367 09:04 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by duncan_idaho:
The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (the first two books are slow, but they are quick reads and if you get past them, the series REALLY pays off).
Oh, yeah, forgot about those, love that series.
[Reply]
Lex Luthor 09:09 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by listopencil:
Yeah, seemed to me that the time he spent bedridden caused him to overthink his morals. He might have been just pushing the envelope but there were some strong incestuous themes in his work. Just take a look at Farnham's Freehold.

I've read them all too. I remember when Friday came out and my dad said to me, "The old guy still has it." I'd say Friday was the best of his last work. I wouldn't call the rest of his last work crap but yeah, there was a noticeable drop off.
At least in Farnham's Freehold the incestuous relationship was never consumated, and Hugh Farnham was appalled at the idea. I think Heinlein liked to write that the young women were the aggressors in these types of relationships because it was some sick fantasy that he had.

Having said that, I will say that Farnham's Freehold was one my favorite Heinlein books. But Starship Troopers was my absolute favorite: it almost made me want to go join the infantry.

If I had never read the Starship Troopers book, I'm sure I would have liked the movie a lot more. Whoever made that movie either completely misunderstood the real message of the book, or just didn't care and decided to go for a farce instead. The first time I saw the movie I was appalled. However, the special effects in the movie were so cool that I was eventually able to get over the differences between the book and the movie and enjoy the movie on its own merits.
[Reply]
Lex Luthor 09:14 PM 03-21-2012
Originally Posted by listopencil:
I remember when Friday came out and my dad said to me, "The old guy still has it." I'd say Friday was the best of his last work.
I agree.
[Reply]
listopencil 12:16 AM 03-22-2012
Originally Posted by Brainiac:
I agree.
Something funny-when I saw that one part of my reply singled out, I vividly recalled that particular scene in my memory. I could see my dad sitting in his leather farting recliner, holding the book out to show me the cover, with his evil looking grin. My parents were divorced and I had spent the previous Summer living with him. I read every Heinlein book that had been published up to that point during that Summer. I am pretty sure I have that paperback edition of Friday in my bedroom right now. Thirty years later.
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