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Media Center>Netflix Price Goes Up $2.00_ What Is Your Pain Threshold?
vailpass 11:55 AM 11-16-2020
Got an email today telling me my new Netflix Premium price is going up $2.00, to $17.99, starting 12/16/2020.

Yet another increase as they boil the frog to the $20 mark. I'll pay it, it's still worth it to me and my three sons. I'm wondering though, at what price point would Netflix not be worth it?

Where would you drop Netflix? $20? $30? $40? $50?
[Reply]
Donger 01:26 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
I think you may have meant OLED?

Also, I'm pretty sure that the best you can get with Standard Netflix is 1080 (HD) and if you want any content in 4K (UHD), you need to be on Premium. I'm 95% sure but I could be wrong.
Yes, it looks like Netflix only streams 4K on their Premium package.
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DaneMcCloud 01:32 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
I think you may have meant OLED?

Also, I'm pretty sure that the best you can get with Standard Netflix is 1080 (HD) and if you want any content in 4K (UHD), you need to be on Premium. I'm 95% sure but I could be wrong.
Netflix broadcasts in 1080p HDR. HDR is High Dynamic Range.

It's confusing to customers because they've purposely made it confusing to lure more customer ("Oh, I need the BEST Netflix!).

It's no different than 8K TV's. Sure, you can purchase an 8K TV but it's going to be years and years before networks broadcast in 8K.
[Reply]
DaneMcCloud 01:38 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Donger:
Yes, it looks like Netflix only streams 4K on their Premium package.
4K is resolution, meaning 4,096 pixels from right to left. HDR broadcasts on Netflix will take advantage of every pixel on a 4K TV.

Ultra High Definition has a different set of specs and while most TV's today can provide a UHD picture, the difference won't be as noticeable, if at all.
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DaneMcCloud 01:40 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
I think you may have meant OLED?
QLED is basically an improvement of existing LCD technology, while OLED is a brand new technology.
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Pants 01:45 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
Netflix broadcasts in HDR, not HD. HDR is High Definition Resolution, which has more pixels than 1080p High Def.

It's confusing to customers because they've purposely made it confusing to lure more customer ("Oh, I need the BEST Netflix!).

It's no different than 8K TV's. Sure, you can purchase an 8K TV but it's going to be years and years before networks broadcast in 8K.
I'm pretty sure HDR is actually "High-dynamic-range" and has little to do with resolution.

HDR makes any picture at any resolution look better. Most 4K TVs have some sort of HDR standard nowadays but it didn't use to be that way when 4K first became commonplace.

I'm 95% sure when when Netflix says HD, they mean 1080 and when they say UHD, they mean 4K.

FTR, QHD/WHQD means 2K (I don't believe there are TVs with that resolution but plenty of PC monitors).

So the "high definition" breakdown goes like this:

HD (1080)
QHD (1440)
UHD (2160)

I don't know what kind of HD 8K resolution is.
[Reply]
DaneMcCloud 01:53 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
I'm pretty sure HDR is actually "High-dynamic-range" and has little to do with resolution.
That's what I meant. Too much techno babble.

Originally Posted by Pants:
I'm 95% sure when when Netflix says HD, they mean 1080 and when they say UHD, they mean 4K.
It's all about screen resolution and Netflix has done a horrible job of providing the correct descriptors.

Personally, I can't tell the difference between UHD and HDR on an OLED 4K TV. Disney+ streams in 4K and I can't tell the difference between their 4K content and that of Netflix HDR 1080p in terms of picture quality.
[Reply]
Pants 02:02 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
That's what I meant. Too much techno babble.



It's all about screen resolution and Netflix has done a horrible job of providing the correct descriptors.

Personally, I can't tell the difference between UHD and HDR on an OLED 4K TV.
HDR is about color reproduction and brightness. UHD is about the number of pixels being rendered on your screen.

I do not see any content in 4K on my 4K TV when I use Netflix because I'm only paying for the "Standard" membership. It still looks nice, but it's not 4K.

When I use Amazon Prime and see something in 4K, the difference is rather noticeable.

OLED will not give you more pixels than standard LED either. OLED is superior due the fact that it can produce true blacks which makes your picture look sharper. It also produces other colors at a broader range making your picture look that much more beautiful and vivid. I'm sure it has other advantages too.
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Hammock Parties 02:17 PM 11-16-2020
PLEX is free.

Pound sand, NFLX.
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DaneMcCloud 02:25 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
UHD is about the number of pixels being rendered on your screen.
UHD has 4 times the resolution of standard HD.
Originally Posted by Pants:
I do not see any content in 4K on my 4K TV when I use Netflix because I'm only paying for the "Standard" membership. It still looks nice, but it's not 4K.
It's not UHD. 4K is a misnomer. There is no such thing as a "4K Broadcast".

Originally Posted by Pants:
When I use Amazon Prime and see something in 4K, the difference is rather noticeable.
You're seeing the difference between 1080p HDR and true UHD.

Again, no programs are broadcast in 4K. It's marketing babble.
[Reply]
htismaqe 02:49 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
Netflix is carrying a pretty massive debt load.

They also leased a brand new building on the corner of Sunset and Bronson, which is diagonal to the original building off of Sunset & Van Ness.

That 13 story building is in addition to a brand new 20 story tower that's near completion, while most of their employees are working from home.
Yep. Their Q3 earnings report wasn't great. Bottom line is bad, too much cost.
[Reply]
htismaqe 02:51 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
Netflix broadcasts in HDR, not HD. HDR is High Definition Resolution, which has more pixels than 1080p High Def.

It's confusing to customers because they've purposely made it confusing to lure more customer ("Oh, I need the BEST Netflix!).

It's no different than 8K TV's. Sure, you can purchase an 8K TV but it's going to be years and years before networks broadcast in 8K.
HDR is actually High Dynamic Range. It's about color/contrast, not resolution.
[Reply]
DaneMcCloud 02:52 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by htismaqe:
HDR is actually High Dynamic Range. It's about color/contrast, not resolution.
Yeah, I mis-typed earlier with all the other techno babble. I'll change that now.

:-)
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Pants 03:41 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
UHD has 4 times the resolution of standard HD.
Correct. Standard HD is 1080, UHD is 2160.

Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
It's not UHD. 4K is a misnomer. There is no such thing as a "4K Broadcast".
I wouldn't call "4K" a misnomer, I would call it a synonym to UHD. Both describe the 4096  2160 resolution (4K comes from that first set of digits you see there). As far as I know, the terms 4K and UHD are interchangeable like HD and 1080. Back in the day, HD was actually 720 and FHD was 1080. But at this point, I think it's just HD = 1080. :-)

I am not trying to be argumentative or combative, I just want to make it clear what one gets at different memberships levels of Netflix.

Standard gets you HD aka 1080 (actual resolution 1920 x 1080). Premium gets you UHD, aka 4K (actual resolution 4096  2160).

Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
You're seeing the difference between 1080p HDR and true UHD.

Again, no programs are broadcast in 4K. It's marketing babble.
I don't know anything about broadcast standards, I just always assumed when they said it was broadcast in 4K, they meant that 4096  2160 resolution.
[Reply]
lcarus 04:07 PM 11-16-2020
I haven't watched Netflix in ages. I may subscribe again for Stranger Things.

Seems like I have Hulu and Shudder activated way more often than anything else these days.
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DaneMcCloud 04:10 PM 11-16-2020
Originally Posted by Pants:
Correct. Standard HD is 1080, UHD is 2160.
Actually, there are two variants of UHD: 3840x2160 and 7680x4320.

Standard HD is 2048x1080.

Originally Posted by Pants:
I wouldn't call "4K" a misnomer, I would call it a synonym to UHD. Both describe the 4096  2160 resolution (4K comes from that first set of digits you see there). As far as I know, the terms 4K and UHD are interchangeable like HD and 1080. Back in the day, HD was actually 720 and FHD was 1080. But at this point, I think it's just HD = 1080. :-)
But it's not a synonym. One refers to Consumer and the other refers to Professional. Marketing departments have conflated the two terms, which are different.

It's kind of like DAT machines in the early 80's and 90's. "Professional" machines could record at both 48k and 44.1k while "Consumer" machines could only record at 48k.

In reality, the Professional Bit Rate was 48k/24 bit while Consumer was 44.1/16 bit. The reason for this was so that people couldn't copy CD's, which were encoded at 44.1, to a Consumer machine that was locked at 48k.

Originally Posted by Pants:
Standard gets you HD aka 1080 (actual resolution 1920 x 1080). Premium gets you UHD, aka 4K (actual resolution 4096  2160).
As I mentioned above, Standard High Definition is 2048x1080 but the displays are only 1920 x 1080.

Also, UHD is a display resolution, not a different encoding mechanism.

Trust me, as someone that scores music to picture and then has to encode the video and audio, then send it back in the required format, this stuff gets really confusing.

The bottom line is that nearly all TV's these days are capable of displaying a standard UHD picture but that doesn't mean that broadcasters are broadcasting true UHD files on their end.
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