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Washington DC and The Holy Land>Kushner's coronavirus team shied away from a national strategy
oaklandhater 01:12 PM 07-31-2020
https://www.businessinsider.com/kush...-report-2020-7

Kushner's coronavirus team shied away from a national strategy, believing that the virus was hitting Democratic states hardest and that they could blame governors, report says

Some members of Jared Kushner's coronavirus task force believed the pandemic would affect Democratic areas worse and may have adjusted accordingly, Vanity Fair reported.
In March and early April, Kushner gathered a team to devise a nationwide coronavirus testing plan.
A public-health expert in regular contact with the team told the magazine that "the political folks" thought a nationwide response was a bad political move.
At the time, outbreaks were worst in Democratic-voting states and cities. The source suggested that some close to Kushner thought it was best to hold back and blame governors.
Kushner's plan was indeed dropped in favor of a mainly state-by-state response. Since then, cases have surged in states on both sides of the political divide.
Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
Members of Jared Kushner's coronavirus task force considered a national-scale testing plan early in the US's coronavirus outbreak.

However, according to a new Vanity Fair report, the plan never came to be, partly because the task force thought it would be better politically to hold off.

The logic, a source told Vanity Fair, was that the virus would hit Democratic-voting areas hardest and that the damage could be blamed on governors instead.

In March and early April, Kushner, a senior White House adviser, led a task force, parallel to the White House's official efforts, to devise a plan to accelerate coronavirus testing and supply chains nationwide.

Ultimately, that was abandoned, and President Donald Trump shifted much of the responsibility for controlling outbreaks to individual states.

A public-health expert who was in regular contact with Kushner's team told Vanity Fair's Katherine Eban that political reasoning may have influenced the decision.

"The political folks believed that because it was going to be relegated to Democratic states, that they could blame those governors, and that would be an effective political strategy," the unnamed expert said.

The expert also said the final call would have been Kushner's. "It was very clear that Jared was ultimately the decision maker as to what [plan] was going to come out," they said.

When the team was working, New York was the epicenter of the US's coronavirus outbreak, with more than 300,000 cases by early April.

It's not the first time the Trump administration has been accused of using politicized reasoning in its pandemic response.

The president wore a face mask in public for the first time in early July, and he has recently signaled a more serious take on a pandemic that he had previously downplayed.

On Monday, however, reports emerged that Trump's pivot may have been motivated by advisers showing him increases in cases in Republican and swing states — "our people," a senior administration official told The Washington Post.

Several states, both red and blue, have seen significant increases in coronavirus cases since beginning to ease lockdowns. Arizona, Florida, and Texas — all of which have Republican governors — are among the states that now have more than 1,000 cases per 100,000 people.
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Raiderhader 03:19 PM 07-31-2020
Maryland style crab cakes

2 pounds jumbo lump BLUE crab meat
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Worcestershire
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons Old Bay Seasoning , plus more for garnish
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 cup Panko bread crumbs
1 large egg lightly beaten

Instructions
Dab crab meat with paper towels to get out excess moisture. Try not to break apart any of the large crab meat lumps.

In a medium bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, Worcestershire sauce, Dijon mustard, Old Bay and lemon juice.

Add crab meat, panko and lightly beaten egg. Toss lightly using your fingers until just moist, again, trying to not break apart any crab meat lumps. If it isn’t sticking, add more panko slowly until it binds. Carefully form 8 jumbo crab cakes or 16 crab balls.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and lightly grease. Place crab cakes on baking sheet.

Preheat broiler to high heat. Place 4-5 inches from heating element. Broil until lightly brown on top, approximately 7-8 minutes.

Remove, transfer to serving plates using a spatula and then garnish with minced parsley (optional) and a sprinkle of Old Bay seasoning. Serve with your choice of dipping sauces.
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oaklandhater 03:29 PM 07-31-2020
Originally Posted by Al Czervik:

via GIPHY



Are you really struggling to understand the discussion here?

Before the SCAMdemic......you were praying for Boomers to die off.....
And spare us with the "joking" part.....you were not joking.

Now, since you go OMB, you are suddenly concerned for EVERYONE, including Boomers....

Do you see the problem here?

It is call being a ****ing Hypocrite.....
Just own it.....Cuz that is what you are.

I always said naturally.

I wouldn't wish a covid death on my worst enemy.
[Reply]
Imon Yourside 03:41 PM 07-31-2020
Ok Oak not quite as good as a supermarket tabloid but you get a bronze star for effort.
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mililo4cpa 03:48 PM 07-31-2020
Originally Posted by oaklandhater:
I always said naturally.

I wouldn't wish a covid death on my worst enemy.
Notwithstanding that viruses are naturally occurring (unless you think that CV-19 is man-made), are you implying that death now has "levels", and one level of death is more preferred than another?

I mean, you do realize that people die in many varying ways, some more or less painful than others, but generally the stories of people dying peacefully in their sleep is probably, in actuality, very rare. So, when you say something like "Boomers can die....", it's generally implied that you don't care the manner in which that happens, and, as stated above death is mostly pain induced before the end.

so, nobody buys the "as long as boomers die peacefully in their sleep, then cool, but Covid! oh no!" attempt. Wishing death on someone is wishing death, and quite honestly, it shows just how vile an individual you really are.
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oaklandhater 05:31 PM 07-31-2020
Originally Posted by mililo4cpa:
Notwithstanding that viruses are naturally occurring (unless you think that CV-19 is man-made), are you implying that death now has "levels", and one level of death is more preferred than another?

I mean, you do realize that people die in many varying ways, some more or less painful than others, but generally the stories of people dying peacefully in their sleep is probably, in actuality, very rare. So, when you say something like "Boomers can die....", it's generally implied that you don't care the manner in which that happens, and, as stated above death is mostly pain induced before the end.

so, nobody buys the "as long as boomers die peacefully in their sleep, then cool, but Covid! oh no!" attempt. Wishing death on someone is wishing death, and quite honestly, it shows just how vile an individual you really are.
baby boomers are the most hated for a reason.

https://www.theatlantic.com/national...ration/276368/

Why the Boomers Are the Most Hated Generation
F. Scott Fitzgerald's flappers also grew up in a time of plenty, but they were allowed to age out of their sybaritic image. What makes the Boomers different?

Concert-goers push a stalled VW bus in Missouri, 1974 (Wikimedia Commons)
Pity the baby boomers, blamed in their youth for every ill and excess of American society and now, in their dotage, for threatening to sink the economy and perhaps Western civilization itself.

The revival of The Great Gatsby serves as a reminder that continuing to blame boomers even in their old age was not a foregone conclusion. The young people of the 1920s were as controversial to their older contemporaries as their counterparts in the 1960s and 1970s. They were called flappers (less commonly "sheiks," in the case of men), or Bright Young Things in England. The cartoons of John Held, Jr. have memorialized their hair styles, bobbed for women, slicked back for men -- the Beatles cuts and Afros of their own time. But the gilded youth of that earlier age, having enjoyed bootleg liquor and cigarettes rather than stronger substances, were allowed to make a discreet transition to middle age and then little old lady and gentleman status without the medical clucking or cultural sneers of journalists. They vanished back into the multitude while the so-called Boomers seem destined to be hounded to death. Why?

One obvious contrast is that high-flying former young people suffered with their elders and their children in the Depression, and some of them were still young enough to serve alongside teenagers in the Second World War. But the turbulent 1970s were succeeded not by a new depression but by the Reagan-era boom of the 1980s, in which the Boomers metamorphosed into new folk heroes/villains, the Yuppies. Only the prosperous ones were noted as constituting a generation; the poor melted back into their communities.

There was a second difference. Age consciousness had been growing since the late nineteenth century but was still relatively rudimentary in the 1920s; "middle age," for example, had just been invented and was not fully part of the culture until Walter B. Pitkin's Life Begins at Forty (1933). But it was the postwar media world that created a distinctive youth mass market and thus began the definition of a generation by its popular music and amusements. In the nineteenth century, generations referred to cohorts who shared momentous political and military events that their younger siblings didn't: the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, the First World War. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a classic description of his own cohort in its historic framework:

We were born to power and intense nationalism. We did not have to stand up in a movie house and recite a child's pledge to the flag to be aware of it. We were told, individually and as a unit, that we were a race that could potentially lick ten others of any genus. This is not a nostalgic article for it has a point to make -- but we began life in post-Fauntleroy suits (often a sailor's uniform as a taunt to Spain). Jingo was the lingo. ...

That America passed away somewhere between 1910 and 1920; and the fact gives my generation its uniqueness -- we are at once prewar and postwar. We were well-grown in the tense Spring of 1917, but for the most part not married and settled. The peace found us almost intact--less than five percent of my college class were killed in the war, and the colleges had a high average compared to the country as a whole. Men of our age in Europe simply do not exist. I have looked for them often, but they are twenty-five years dead.

So we inherited two worlds -- the one of hope to which we had been bred; the one of disillusion which we had discovered early for ourselves. And that first world was growing as remote as another country, however close in time.
Third, there was a vast difference in the experience of world history. Fitzgerald's generation -- at least the white upper middle class to which he belonged -- shared a unifying experience of expansionist patriotism and post-World War I disillusionment. Vietnam, on the other hand, divided the young as it did the rest of the country. In fact, as the political scientist Gordon L. Bowen has written:

Contrary to the myth, when Americans were asked whether they supported or opposed the war, the youngest set of Americans were uniformly more supportive of the war than were oldest set of Americans. Moreover, 20-somethings also were almost uniformly more likely to be supportive of the war than were 30 to 49 year olds.

Bowen also shows that throughout the war, college graduates were more likely to favor it than were people whose education stopped at elementary school.

Finally, there is a fourth reason. Old age wasn't really officially defined in America until the Social Security Act set it at 65. The youth of the 1920s began to pay into the system and benefited in the 1960s and 1970s from pensions and Medicare thanks in part to the payments of young people entering the work force then. Now that they are reaching retirement age, they are a ripe target for demonization in the interest of "entitlement reform" as their grandparents never were. There are legitimate arguments about the financing and extent of Social Security and the level of contributions by wealthier people; I don't mean to dismiss such concerns. But Boomerphobia -- with no counterpart in Fitzgerald's time -- appears to have filled the media niche left by the political incorrectness of older stereotypes. If this collective scapegoat didn't exist, it would have to be invented.
[Reply]
Taco John 05:51 PM 07-31-2020
Originally Posted by oaklandhater:
Sounds like they thought it would hurt Dem governors more.

Didn't think about the long haul.

Desantis and abbott look like shit right now
To who? Committed Democrats?
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Just Passin' By 11:55 PM 07-31-2020

Rep. @SteveScalise: “Not only did China lie, they corrupted the World Health Organization” pic.twitter.com/s3IAoBaT9I

— Benny (@bennyjohnson) July 31, 2020


You keep hearing, without any evidence, that we had “no national plan” to combat COVID. But that has never been true, and ignores the significant steps taken by the federal government and private industry.@SteveScalise debunks the myth: pic.twitter.com/GIHIDFF4Ow

— Rep. Dan Crenshaw (@RepDanCrenshaw) July 31, 2020

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Just Passin' By 12:34 AM 08-01-2020

pic.twitter.com/DzCU5kF6Mm

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 30, 2020

[Reply]
Al Czervik 08:10 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by Just Passin' By:
BBBBBUUUUTTTTTT......

ORANGE MAN BAD...... /CP TARDLibbers

Dont expect any of the resident Leftist Loons to show up in the thread after that video.
[Reply]
chiefzilla1501 09:00 AM 08-01-2020
I pray we never have an epidemic that is both contagious and deadly. God forbid that ever happens. While other countries ramped up their testing and pandemic response we will be sending our people out to slaughter.

The reason Korea is miles ahead in their response is that they took MERS and SARS really seriously. Why would people not want that? They have both controlled the spread and reopened the economy way more successfully. We can't do either.
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chiefzilla1501 09:09 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by Just Passin' By:


If there was a contagious AND lethal pandemic tomorrow, how prepared with the US be? Not being prepared is excusable. That is some might strong Kool aid if you seriously think the US is in a good place right now.
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Bowser 09:14 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by chiefzilla1501:
If there was a contagious AND lethal pandemic tomorrow, how prepared with the US be? Not being prepared is excusable. That is some might strong Kool aid if you seriously think the US is in a good place right now.
Is this a thinly veiled "Orange Man Bad" blast? Because it feels like it.

And why just single out the US here? How many modern countries have encapsulated hazmat suits ready to go for their populaces' use, much less second or third world countries?
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chiefzilla1501 09:26 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by Bowser:
Is this a thinly veiled "Orange Man Bad" blast? Because it feels like it.

And why just single out the US here? How many modern countries have encapsulated hazmat suits ready to go for their populaces' use, much less second or third world countries?
It's not thinly veiled. Look, we couldn't have been prepared for this. Most countries weren't. I actually thought our disaster response early on was pretty good. And that Pence did a pretty good job. Somewhere along the line the switch flipped. Kushner abandoned the testing plan, Trump became a hoaxer, and you can tell Pence didn't look to be in control anymore.

No country out there is hazmat level. But they are miles ahead of us in things like testing. And if we can't even get damn PPE for doctors, let alone people, how in the hell will we dream of getting anything like what you're talking about. If we have a next one, other countries may not be perfectly prepared but they've built infrastructure and processes to be miles better. We are even WORSE off because if this happens again our people will be complaining about lockdown while a deadlier version of a pandemic mows us down.
[Reply]
Bowser 09:33 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by chiefzilla1501:
It's not thinly veiled. Look, we couldn't have been prepared for this. Most countries weren't. I actually thought our disaster response early on was pretty good. And that Pence did a pretty good job. Somewhere along the line the switch flipped. Kushner abandoned the testing plan, Trump became a hoaxer, and you can tell Pence didn't look to be in control anymore.

No country out there is hazmat level. But they are miles ahead of us in things like testing. And if we can't even get damn PPE for doctors, let alone people, how in the hell will we dream of getting anything like what you're talking about. If we have a next one, other countries may not be perfectly prepared but they've built infrastructure and processes to be miles better. We are even WORSE off because if this happens again our people will be complaining about lockdown while a deadlier version of a pandemic mows us down.
I'm reading all of this and picturing you just puking up leftist fear mongering propaganda. The correct answer is that no country is prepared for a TRUE society ending or extinction level event in the form of a virus. But keep hating on Trump, because this is all what this really is.
[Reply]
Raiderhader 09:42 AM 08-01-2020
Originally Posted by chiefzilla1501:
It's not thinly veiled. Look, we couldn't have been prepared for this. Most countries weren't. I actually thought our disaster response early on was pretty good. And that Pence did a pretty good job. Somewhere along the line the switch flipped. Kushner abandoned the testing plan, Trump became a hoaxer, and you can tell Pence didn't look to be in control anymore.

No country out there is hazmat level. But they are miles ahead of us in things like testing. And if we can't even get damn PPE for doctors, let alone people, how in the hell will we dream of getting anything like what you're talking about. If we have a next one, other countries may not be perfectly prepared but they've built infrastructure and processes to be miles better. We are even WORSE off because if this happens again our people will be complaining about lockdown while a deadlier version of a pandemic mows us down.
That is what happens when you use such an extreme (and destructive in its own right) measure when it is not necessary.
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