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Media Center>Disney announces 100% focus on streaming. The death of movie theaters?
Deberg_1990 05:21 PM 10-12-2020
Hmmm.


Disney is going all-in on streaming media.

On Monday, the company announced a massive reorganization of its media and entertainment business that will focus on developing productions that will debut on its streaming and broadcast services. Disney’s media businesses, ads, and distribution, and Disney+ will now operate under the same business unit, the company said.

Its major reorganization comes just days after activist investor Dan Loeb, a major investor in the company through his Third Point Capital hedge fund, called on Disney to cancel its dividend and redirect more investments into streaming.

Wall Street has already given its seal of approval to Disney’s new move, sending the share up nearly 6% in after hours trading.

Disney’s announcement follows a significant reorganization of its release schedule to address new realities including a collapsing theatrical release business; production issues; and the runaway success of its streaming service — all caused or accelerated by the national failure to effectively address the COVID-19 pandemic.

Planned theatrical releases of would-be tentpole films like “Black Widow” have been rescheduled, while other films including “Mulan” and the upcoming Pixar film “Soul” are seeing their first runs on Disney’s streaming service, Disney+.

Production of new material for Disney’s many provinces of intellectual property will fall under three groups — Studios, General Entertainment, and Sports. Leadership of these groups won’t change with Alan F. Horn and Alan Bergman, Peter Rice and James Pitaro maintaining their respective positions within the organization, the company said.

Overseeing operations for this singularly large new operational structure will be Kareem Daniel, who previously helmed the company’s consumer products, games and publishing operations.

All of the men will report up to Bob Chapek, the company’s chief executive officer.

“Given the incredible success of Disney+ and our plans to accelerate our direct-to-consumer business, we are strategically positioning our Company to more effectively support our growth strategy and increase shareholder value,” Chapek said in a statement. “Managing content creation distinct from distribution will allow us to be more effective and nimble in making the content consumers want most, delivered in the way they prefer to consume it. Our creative teams will concentrate on what they do best—making world-class, franchise-based content—while our newly centralized global distribution team will focus on delivering and monetizing that content in the most optimal way across all platforms, including Disney+, Hulu, ESPN+ and the coming Star international streaming service.”

Studios will run all of the company’s development activities for live action and animated productions coming from Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios and Searchlight Pictures.

General Entertainment will serve the same function for the company’s 20th Television and ABC Signature and Touchstone Television productions, along with its news divisions, Disney channels, Freeform, FX, and National Geographic.

Sports will focus on ESPN and sports productions including live events, and original, and non-scripted sports related material for cable channels, ESPN+ and ABC, the company said.

Overseeing the monetization, distribution, operations, sales, advertising and data and technology infrastructure for all of those groups will be Daniel. A longtime Disney executive, he formerly served as the head of the company’s Imagineering Operations, taking intellectual property and turning it into entertainment for the vast empire of Disney resorts and theme parks, before taking over the consumer products, games and publishing operations at the company.

“Kareem is an exceptionally talented, innovative and forward-looking leader, with a strong track record for developing and implementing successful global content distribution and commercialization strategies,” said Chapek. “As we now look to rapidly grow our direct-to-consumer business, a key focus will be delivering and monetizing our great content in the most optimal way possible, and I can think of no one better suited to lead this effort than Kareem. His wealth of experience will enable him to effectively bring together the Company’s distribution, advertising, marketing and sales functions, thereby creating a distribution powerhouse that will serve all of Disney’s media and entertainment businesses.”

The new structure is effective immediately, and the Company expects to transition to financial reporting under this structure in the first quarter of fiscal 2021.

The Company will hold a virtual Investor Day on December 10, where it will present further details of its direct-to-consumer strategies.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/techcru...streaming/amp/
[Reply]
htismaqe 10:29 PM 10-18-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
There will come a day when Disney is the largest streamer in the world but Netflix isn’t going anywhere. They’re doing huge budget blockbusters with every movie star in the world and basically own the stand up comedy scene.

They’re making more and better films than Sony, Universal, Paramount and Warner Brothers combined and they’re the destination for awesome TV series.

Netflix hired a new VP of Animation, whom they hired away from Disney after 25 years recently, too.
All fair points. It will be interesting to see how they weather the storm.
[Reply]
Deberg_1990 05:45 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by htismaqe:
The future of Netflix is interesting. They built their user base on being the one-stop shop for nearly everything. As the market has changed and more and more content producers have developed their own streaming services, they've made the hard switch to self-produced content but will it be enough to hold off the big guys?

I wouldn't bank on it.
I think they have done a great job of transitioning from streaming old starz network movies to original programming. They have a lot of legit buzz worthy series now.


Agreed, they do have a lot of trash, but their ‘throw anything at the wall and see what sticks’ strategy has worked mostly.

Unlike Dane, I ok with HBOMax. But agree the app is confusing. And they should have kept HBO separate. The HBO brand was strong by itself. now they watered it down by merging it within the all inclusive HBO Max.
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backinblack 06:33 AM 10-19-2020
HBO Max has a lot of interesting stuff on it, but at the same time it seems more interested in drawing people with Friends and Big Bang Theory reruns. They have so much more power and resources than to be focusing on old sitcoms that everyone has seen a billion times, leave that to Nick at Nite.

and it's been months and there's still no availability on Roku, drives me nuts. Can only watch it on my Xbox or my computer.
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JD10367 07:08 AM 10-19-2020
Disney definitely has a price point advantage over Netflix right now, as Netflix charges you more for HD (which is kind of bullshit). And Netflix is definitely having their library bitten into by other services. Much like HBO and Showtime and others, both Netflix and Disney will continue to rely on exclusive weekly-episode content to drive customers.

An interesting player in all this is Amazon Prime. This is a company that also offers streaming content--both cinema and exclusive--but also built some other hooks into its model. They offer music and books, and speedier shipping from their shopping site. Disney+ could--and probably will--raise their price, more to the level of the competitors, but they could also easily throw in some other bones like a small discount to the theme parks, the Disney Store, access to ESPN+, whatever.
[Reply]
htismaqe 07:37 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by JD10367:
Disney definitely has a price point advantage over Netflix right now, as Netflix charges you more for HD (which is kind of bullshit). And Netflix is definitely having their library bitten into by other services. Much like HBO and Showtime and others, both Netflix and Disney will continue to rely on exclusive weekly-episode content to drive customers.

An interesting player in all this is Amazon Prime. This is a company that also offers streaming content--both cinema and exclusive--but also built some other hooks into its model. They offer music and books, and speedier shipping from their shopping site. Disney+ could--and probably will--raise their price, more to the level of the competitors, but they could also easily throw in some other bones like a small discount to the theme parks, the Disney Store, access to ESPN+, whatever.
Disney, with the Fox purchase, now has bundle that includes Disney+, ESPN+, and Hulu.

Amazon Prime we just don't use much anymore. So much of their content requires additional purchases now and the free content is lacking.
[Reply]
lawrenceRaider 08:37 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by htismaqe:
Disney, with the Fox purchase, now has bundle that includes Disney+, ESPN+, and Hulu.

Amazon Prime we just don't use much anymore. So much of their content requires additional purchases now and the free content is lacking.
I find that to be pretty much the opposite on Amazon. Plenty to view on Amazon Prime, new content constantly being added. Both Amazon Originals, and movies/series from other sources.
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lawrenceRaider 08:38 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by backinblack:
HBO Max has a lot of interesting stuff on it, but at the same time it seems more interested in drawing people with Friends and Big Bang Theory reruns. They have so much more power and resources than to be focusing on old sitcoms that everyone has seen a billion times, leave that to Nick at Nite.

and it's been months and there's still no availability on Roku, drives me nuts. Can only watch it on my Xbox or my computer.
Can't sideload apps like you can on a FireTV stick/box?
[Reply]
DaneMcCloud 10-19-2020, 09:24 AM
This message has been deleted by DaneMcCloud.
DaneMcCloud 09:30 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by Deberg_1990:
Unlike Dane, I ok with HBOMax. But agree the app is confusing. And they should have kept HBO separate. The HBO brand was strong by itself. now they watered it down by merging it within the all inclusive HBO Max.
I couldn't care less about the app. Hulu's app has been pretty much straight-up garbage but they offer great commercial free programming for a very reasonable price. I'm paying $18.99 a month for Disney+, ESPN+ and Ad-Free Hulu, which seems almost criminally under-priced.

My issues with HBO Max are that they're charging $14.99 for a service that isn't head and shoulders above Amazon, Netflix, Hulu or Disney+, that doesn't have 4K offerings and for a company that has decided that feuding with Roku and Amazon about ad dollars more important than servicing their customers, 80% of which use either Roku or Fire. If I didn't receive HBO Max for $7.50 a month through Spectrum, I wouldn't pay for it, period. And now that I can't even watch the app, I'm very close to dumping it altogether.

Also, I didn't include Amazon in my prior posts because while Prime Video is a nice feature, it's no where near the primary driver for Amazon's business. I've paid for Prime since 2006 and it's only been in the past few years that I've even paid attention to any of their offerings.

Amazon would easily survive without Prime Video. The same can't be said for Disney or Netflix or Hulu.
[Reply]
htismaqe 09:33 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
I couldn't care less about the app. Hulu's app has been pretty much straight-up garbage but they offer great commercial free programming for a very reasonable price. I'm paying $18.99 a month for Disney+, ESPN+ and Ad-Free Hulu, which seems almost criminally under-priced.

My issues with HBO Max is that they're charging $14.99 for a service that isn't head and shoulders above Amazon, Netflix, Hulu or Disney+, that doesn't have 4K offerings and for a company that has decided that feuding with Roku and Amazon about ad dollars more important than servicing their customers, 80% of which use either Roku or Fire. If I didn't receive HBO Max for $7.50 a month through Spectrum, I wouldn't pay for it, period. And now that I can't even watch the app, I'm very close to dumping it altogether.

Also, I didn't include Amazon in my prior posts because while Prime Video is a nice feature, it's no where near the primary driver for Amazon's business. I've paid for Prime since 2006 and it's only been in the past few years that I've even paid attention to any of their offerings.

Amazon would easily survive without Prime Video. The same can't be said for Disney or Netflix or Hulu.
We've had Prime since the beginning, it was the first streaming service we had because we got it for free (we send and receive dozens of packages a month).

They have a ton of original content but unlike Netflix, it doesn't really appeal to anybody here. It seems like every year, the utility decreases due to lack of older, free content (that is being removed in favor of original content).

The heavy users in my house use Hulu, Netflix, and Disney in that order.
[Reply]
Deberg_1990 10:03 AM 10-19-2020
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
I couldn't care less about the app. Hulu's app has been pretty much straight-up garbage but they offer great commercial free programming for a very reasonable price. I'm paying $18.99 a month for Disney+, ESPN+ and Ad-Free Hulu, which seems almost criminally under-priced.

My issues with HBO Max are that they're charging $14.99 for a service that isn't head and shoulders above Amazon, Netflix, Hulu or Disney+, that doesn't have 4K offerings and for a company that has decided that feuding with Roku and Amazon about ad dollars more important than servicing their customers, 80% of which use either Roku or Fire. If I didn't receive HBO Max for $7.50 a month through Spectrum, I wouldn't pay for it, period. And now that I can't even watch the app, I'm very close to dumping it altogether.

Also, I didn't include Amazon in my prior posts because while Prime Video is a nice feature, it's no where near the primary driver for Amazon's business. I've paid for Prime since 2006 and it's only been in the past few years that I've even paid attention to any of their offerings.

Amazon would easily survive without Prime Video. The same can't be said for Disney or Netflix or Hulu.
Ah ok....I get HBO Max bundled in my AT&T package. SO i have a different perspective on it. I wouldnt pay $14.99 a month for it.
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DaneMcCloud 02:45 PM 10-19-2020
In related news, Channing Dungey, who was the VP of Content at Netflix, was confirmed as Chairman of Warner Brothers Television Group. Prior to Netflix, she was President of ABC Entertainment.

Hopefully, HBO Max will begin making more consistently good TV entertainment.
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