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Washington DC and The Holy Land>Clowns to the left of me . . .
NinerDoug 07:08 AM 02-02-2021
I think I understand how she got to be a “former” university professor.

Crazy Bernie is privileged to be crazy. Ok.

https://nypost.com/2021/02/02/teache...lege-in-op-ed/

San Francisco teacher writes in op-ed: Bernie Sanders’ mittens a ‘lesson in white privilege

A San Francisco high school teacher wrote an Op-ed claiming Sen. Bernie Sanders “manifests privilege” for wearing his meme-evoking inauguration outfit.

Ingrid Seyer-Ochi, a former UC Berkeley professor, wrote in the San Francisco Chronicle that the Vermont senator’s choice of recycled wool mittens mittens was integrated into her class discussion on US diversity and discrimination.

Initially, on Inauguration Day, Seyer-Ochi said her class talked about the deeper meanings of the historic day — including “the vulnerability of democracy” and “the power of ritual” and gender.

Sanders, the teacher said, was not even on their radar until he became an instant internet sensation over his mittens and brown parka.

“I puzzled and fumed as an individual as I strove to be my best possible teacher. What did I see? What did I think my students should see?” Seyer-Ochi wrote.

“A wealthy, incredibly well-educated and -privileged white man, showing up for perhaps the most important ritual of the decade, in a puffy jacket and huge mittens.”

The senator, she said, “manifests privilege, white privilege, male privilege and class privilege, in ways that my students could see and feel.”

Seyer-Ochi said in the op-ed that many people without privilege would not be able to dress like Sanders did on such an occasion.

“I don’t know many poor, or working class, or female, or struggling-to-be-taken-seriously folk who would show up at the inauguration of our 46th president dressed like Bernie,” she said.

The op-ed left many people on social media scratching their heads.

“So Bernie represents the terrible privilege of the white & rich because he *reads article* didn’t wear expensive clothes,” one commenter on Twitter wrote.

“Apparently it is privilege to dress comfortably and NOT privilege to wear expensive designer clothing while the media talks about ensembles like it’s a red carpet event,” another Twitter user commented.

A third person on Twitter wrote: “The only ‘privilege’ I see right now is being able to publish a bad faith opinion piece in a newspaper with a paywall,” one commenter on Twitter wrote.
[Reply]
Pogue 08:09 PM 02-02-2021
Originally Posted by Beef Supreme:
Mittens are racist
That’s so 2012.



[Reply]
Dayze 10:08 PM 02-02-2021
Originally Posted by T-post Tom:
"I puzzled and fumed as an individual as I strove to be my best possible teacher."

:-)

For Ingrid, it's not a matter of "why commit suicide" ... but "why not?" She should not be a teacher of children. Of any age. Ever.

If R. lee Ermey had a psycho left wing nut job for a daughter...
[Reply]
T-post Tom 11:58 PM 02-02-2021
Originally Posted by Dayze:
If R. lee Ermey had a psycho left wing nut job for a daughter...
Don't do Gunny like that. :-)
[Reply]
srvy 12:12 AM 02-03-2021
Originally Posted by cosmo20002:
Here's how it works:

When somebody says something crazy, often a pic is posted to illustrate that the person didn't just say something crazy, they also LOOK crazy. It reinforces and emphasizes just how crazy they are.

The person you posted just looks like a pretty much regular person. So, no real point in posting it.


A corollary to this is that if someone says something you disagree with, like if they are outspoken against Trump, and it turns out that they are really fat or ugly, then a Trumper will post a pic in an attempt to discredit what they said by showing that the person is not attractive. Or is black. Or foreign. Or Jewish, etc. Because those types of people can be discredited by how they look or where they came from.

[Reply]
2112 05:19 AM 02-03-2021
Originally Posted by Loneiguana:
On day, you and the other mouth breathers, will figure out the so called liberals that live in your head aren't real. Maybe.

Your right. You'll always be this stupid.
Before calling someone stupid you might want to look at the difference between your and you’re. Idiot
[Reply]
Loneiguana 06:07 AM 02-03-2021
Originally Posted by 2112:
Before calling someone stupid you might want to look at the difference between your and you’re. Idiot
Stupid people look for these kinds of typos because it's the only thing they really have.

How pathetic for you.
[Reply]
2112 06:11 AM 02-03-2021
Originally Posted by Loneiguana:
Stupid people look for these kinds of typos because it's the only thing they really have.

How pathetic for you.
No, stupid people (yourself) calling others stupid while not checking their own posts look stupid. If the name fits wear it. And you wear it proudly.
[Reply]
NinerDoug 08:33 AM 02-22-2021
https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...r-15968316.php
[Reply]
IowaHawkeyeChief 08:43 AM 02-22-2021
Was she the one caught using mittens under her desk? :-)
[Reply]
mr. tegu 09:04 AM 02-22-2021
Originally Posted by NinerDoug:
https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...r-15968316.php

Can’t read this it’s behind a paywall.
[Reply]
Chiefs4TheWin 11:37 AM 02-22-2021
I'm sure any rational person thinks this is utterly stupid.
[Reply]
eDave 11:42 AM 02-22-2021
Originally Posted by mr. tegu:
Can’t read this it’s behind a paywall.
Insert "outline.com/" before the URL of the news link, my man.
[Reply]
loochy 11:44 AM 02-22-2021
Originally Posted by eDave:
Insert "outline.com/" before the URL of the news link, my man.

That's a hell of a tip and should be stickied.
[Reply]
NinerDoug 12:20 PM 02-22-2021
Originally Posted by mr. tegu:
Can’t read this it’s behind a paywall.
That's weird. I read the article on my phone this morning, but it wouldn't let me copy and paste. Try to open it now on my PC, and the paywall is there.

Basically, The SF School District had a lot of blow back about their decision to rename schools (including Washington, Lincoln, and Jefferson), and appear to be back tracking.

Part of it was their receipt of a letter from an attorney accusing them of violation of the Brown Act, by making the decision in a closed door session.
[Reply]
NinerDoug 12:23 PM 02-22-2021
Originally Posted by eDave:
Insert "outline.com/" before the URL of the news link, my man.
Holy shit, that is awesome!

Here's the article:

S.F. school board pauses renaming process for 44 schools after coming under fire

“There have been many distracting public debates as we’ve been working to reopen our schools,” she wrote. “School renaming has been one of them. It was a process begun in 2018 with a timeline that didn’t anticipate a pandemic. I acknowledge and take responsibility that mistakes were made in the renaming process.”

López said working to reopen schools will be the board’s “only focus,” and renaming committee meetings will be canceled in the meantime. She said the board plans to make the process more “deliberative” by getting local historians involved.

“In the meantime, this is the last time I’ll comment publicly on renaming until schools are reopened,” she wrote. “We will not be taking valuable time from our board agendas to further discuss this, as we need to prioritize reopening.”

Other board members declined to comment.

On Feb. 10., San Francisco attorney Paul D. Scott sent a demand letter addressed to López alleging a violation of the Brown Act, California’s open-meeting law. He argued that the board did not properly notify the public that it was making a final decision to rename the school sites and provided advance notice only that it would decide on a list of “potential” schools to be renamed.

He said families and the public were denied due process, and the matter instead should be handled on a school-by-school basis. The letter gave the board 30 days to reverse the decision or legal action would be taken. On Tuesday, the board held a seven-hour closed special meeting that presumably addressed the legal challenge and renaming issue.

In response to the opinion piece, Scott said he is glad the board has “evidently seen reason,” but he wants “specifics in writing” before deciding whether to continue with any legal action.

“Changes of this magnitude should not be imposed from on high on our local communities,” he said. “Parents, students, teachers, alumni and others connected to each school are the true stakeholders. They should be trusted to make good judgments for their particular school and have their point of view be respected.”

On Jan. 27, the school board voted 6-1 to rename 44 schools because they bear the names of historical figures said to be linked to racism and oppression, from Dianne Feinstein Elementary to Jefferson Elementary to Abraham Lincoln High School.

Critics of the renaming cited errors made by the committee appointed to recommend schools to be renamed based on connections to slavery, oppression, racism and colonization. In several cases, the committee members relied on Wikipedia to make a decision on whether a name met criteria.

In the case of Alamo Elementary, the committee cited the Battle of the Alamo and its connection to the taking of Mexican land during the Texas Revolution. But in reality, the school was more likely named after the Spanish word for cottonwood tree, based on the tree that identified a traveler’s rest station in the city, which is now Alamo Square.

“I’m delighted to hear that the school board has an understanding of how flawed the process was,” said Terence Abad, executive director of the alumni association for Lowell High School, which was also on the list for renaming. “Like most people, I do think the process on renaming is important, and I welcome doing it in an orderly and appropriate way.”

Abad noted that because of the renaming process, additional research has shown that Lowell likely wasn’t named after James Lowell, the poet, but rather just Lowell, perhaps based on Lowell, Mass., given a letter from the district superintendent in 1894 referred to the school’s new name as only “Lowell High School.”

The decision garnered national attention and has been criticized by leaders and parents for being poorly timed while families struggle during the pandemic. In October, Mayor London Breed slammed the renaming plan.

Meanwhile, pressure has been building on school officials to reopen classrooms, which have been shut for almost a year. At a news conference Wednesday, Lopez and San Francisco Unified Superintendent Vincent Matthews said officials are trying to resume in-person learning as soon as possible, but declined to guess when the first students might be back. The district said recently the goal is to have six weeks of partial live instruction before the school year ends June 2.

San Francisco’s city attorney has sued the school district, alleging that officials failed to create a specific reopening plan as required by state law, and violated the state Constitution and equal rights laws by not providing in-person instruction despite the ability to do so.

The controversy helped fuel a signature drive, begun Friday, to recall three members of the board. So far, more than 1,200 city residents have signed a petition to recall President López, Vice President Alison Collins and Commissioner Faauuga Moliga.

The effort will need 70,000 signatures for each of the three members to get the recall on the ballot. Organizers Autumn Looijen and Siva Raj, who are parents of five children, said they wanted to “get politics out of education.”
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