ChiefsPlanet Mobile
Page 3 of 15
< 123 456713 > Last »
The Marty Lounge>They are coming for the chop too
BigRedChief 06:16 PM 07-05-2020
The Kansas City Chiefs’ racist “Arrowhead Chop” has flown under the radar. Not anymore. The Kansas City Chiefs’ chant isn’t a tribute to people like me. It’s racist.

Rest of original post
Spoiler!

https://www.vox.com/first-person/202...fs-kansas-city


KC Star:
https://www.kansascity.com/sports/sp...244153762.html


Kansas City Magazine:
https://www.kansascitymag.com/is-the...s-who-you-ask/

Twitter has its own hashtag
https://mobile.twitter.com/chopisracist

NY Times: Stop the Chop
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/29/s...hawk-chop.html
[Reply]
007 07:50 PM 07-05-2020
Ok
[Reply]
OrtonsPiercedTaint 07-05-2020, 07:52 PM
This message has been deleted by OrtonsPiercedTaint.
RunKC 07:55 PM 07-05-2020
Clark’s gonna be pissed when they come for the beating of the drum after he spent a pretty penny to make that awesome drum deck
[Reply]
Bwana 07:58 PM 07-05-2020
Ignore them. If you want to do the chop, do the chop.
[Reply]
Spott 07:58 PM 07-05-2020
Sometimes I hear it and think it’s kind of corny, but I do love hearing the chop during road games and hearing it at the Super Bowl was amazing.
[Reply]
OrtonsPiercedTaint 08:00 PM 07-05-2020
Fight for your to right to party will sell more stadium beer.
[Reply]
Chiefaholic 08:00 PM 07-05-2020
I'm part Irish.... That's right. **** your Lucky Charms, beyotch. I'm offended because.... Well, I don't know. But, I'm definitely offended about something.
[Reply]
OrtonsPiercedTaint 08:04 PM 07-05-2020
The Missouri and Kansan Indians may not be happy with Jackson county anyway.
[Reply]
Chiefaholic 08:08 PM 07-05-2020
Who were the tribes they brought in a few years ago for input on the drum and what-not?
[Reply]
BlackOp 08:12 PM 07-05-2020
In fairness...the "chop" didn't do shit for the Chiefs in 50 years.
[Reply]
BDj23 08:12 PM 07-05-2020
Originally Posted by Bwana:
Ignore them. If you want to do the chop, do the chop.
Cant wait to get called into HR some random Monday morning to plead for my job over doing the chop at Arrowhead stadium
[Reply]
displacedinMN 08:17 PM 07-05-2020
Originally Posted by KChiefs1:
Isn’t Kansas City named after native Americans?
Half of everything is.


Mohawk carpet is next.

Then anything with the word 'white' in it.
[Reply]
sedated 08:33 PM 07-05-2020
That article was clearly before the Super Bowl, so 6 months old?

Everyone has lost their minds and its so tiring. Not only the people writing these click bait opinions, but also the people screaming about how they are losing everything they love.
[Reply]
Hydrae 08:33 PM 07-05-2020
https://www.chiefs.com/news/chiefs-c...l-tribes-x4607

Originally Posted by :
Tuesday, Dec 03, 2019 11:53 AM


Chiefs Celebrate American Indian Heritage Month by Honoring Local Tribes

Matt McMullen



The Kansas City Chiefs celebrated American Indian Heritage Month for a sixth-consecutive year at Arrowhead Stadium on Sunday as part of the Chiefs' ongoing commitment to honoring the Native community.

Representatives from several different tribes were on hand for a number of pregame and in-game events dedicated to observing Native American culture and educating the fans in attendance.

The event existed through a collaboration between the Chiefs and the American Indian Community Working Group, which serves as a liaison for the Native community and as an advisor to the Chiefs in order to promote an awareness and understanding of Native cultures and tribes in the region.

The ceremony began with the Blessing of the Four Directions, led by Fred Thomas from the Kickapoo Nation of Kansas in the way of their people. The blessing was meant to bring a sense of preparation and good spirit to the afternoon.

Following the blessing, Lakota Nation native Cody Hall performed a Drum Blessing before the Chief Hill Drum Group, from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of South Dakota, participated in a ceremonial drum Honor Song so that the drum may be later sounded in the Chiefs' tradition.

A drum is much more than just a musical instrument in Native cultures – it holds significant symbolic power. Traditionally constructed from the hides of animals, the drum possesses a powerful spirit representing the life of the animal. The beating of the drum is symbolic of the heartbeat of the animal, uniting those in attendance with the animal's spirit.

After the Honor Song, the colors were presented by the Kansas Native American Color Guard as singer/songwriter Tabitha Fair, a member of the Chickasaw Nation, and Victoria Venier performed the National Anthem while each wearing No. 41 jerseys representing Chiefs' longsnapper James Winchester, who has Choctaw heritage in his family.

"That was pretty cool, I got to shake hands with them afterwards," Winchester said. "I think it's neat that the Chiefs recognize this. My grandma's side is where the Native blood comes from and I'm proud of it."

And for many back in Winchester's native Oklahoma, the five-year veteran serves as an inspiration for what individuals of Native heritage can achieve.

"I don't think I'm deserving of any status as a role model, but you know the people back home think it's cool and they follow me, and that makes it special," Winchester said. "I play this game because I love it, but to be somewhat of an inspiration for people back home is probably the coolest thing about this gig."

As kickoff neared, Chiefs Chairman & CEO Clark Hunt presented a No. 21 Jim Thorpe jersey to Justin Wood, the Principal Chief of the Sac and Fox Nation - which Thorpe was a member of - and two of Thorpe's granddaughters on the field. Thorpe was the first president of the NFL, and the presentation recognized the 100th anniversary of that achievement.

It all made for an educational morning that provided fans with a glimpse into Native cultures and traditions, and the festivities continued into the game itself.

U.S. Air Force and Vietnam War Veteran Jerry Tuckwin, who continues to be an active figure in the operations of the Prairie Band Potawatomi, served as the Lamar Hunt Legacy Seat honoree on Sunday while Special Olympian Bradley Tanner, a native of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, beat the drum as the Tony DiPardo Spirit Leader at the beginning of the fourth quarter.

It all represented a special relationship that was featured on the biggest of stages on Sunday, again demonstrating the Chiefs' commitment to learning from and celebrating the Native community.

[Reply]
Jamie 08:34 PM 07-05-2020
I never understood the logic in bringing back the horse and the drum. The first goal should be to protect the Chiefs name, and bringing in more native stuff just puts us more in the cross hairs.

The chop, I don't care that much. I've never felt comfortable doing it, but I don't see how you could realistically ban it. It's like when they tried to control crowd noise, it's just not going to work.
[Reply]
BigRedChief 08:49 PM 07-05-2020
Originally Posted by Bwana:
Ignore them. If you want to do the chop, do the chop.
fans will always do the chop. Whether the Chief's play the music, whether they bang the drum.
[Reply]
Page 3 of 15
< 123 456713 > Last »
Up