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View Poll Results: Were you homeschooled?
Yes 2 4.55%
No 39 88.64%
George Kittle is a SB Champ! 3 6.82%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll
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Washington DC and The Holy Land>Were you homeschooled?
lewdog 09:12 PM 02-11-2020
Please vote.

I am conducting research.
[Reply]
BIG_DADDY 01:34 PM 02-12-2020
Originally Posted by Detoxing:
At some point ya'll gotta stop blaming the government and schools.

The parent SHOULD have the most communication with the child.

The Child will likely learn from you just by being around you so much. He'll pick up your habits, manners, work ethic and in some cases, even your walk.

You're the parent, you carry more influence than the teacher or school.

If the child isn't doing well in private/public school then maybe YOU, the parent should help the child by spending extra time with him instead of watching him fail and then blaming an institution.

Quit blaming the government for every goddamn thing. It's such a lazy, right wing take.

The buck stops at home. The kids who excel are the kids who get the most pressure at home to do well, and get the most assistance.

WHERE the education comes from doesn't matter nearly as much as good parenting.
No, that's a lazy excuse to support a POS public education system.

You can make it work, sure. Should you have a choice so you don't have to put your kid in a bad environment or be indoctrinated into far left ideology? You bet. Empower people, not government.
[Reply]
loochy 01:40 PM 02-12-2020
Originally Posted by RunKC:
“ The average private school tuition in Kansas is approximately $7,790 per year (2020).”

$650/month not counting extra for uniforms, books, mandatory events, lunch?, etc. So that’s more like $750/month.

Even with a slightly reduced rate for a scholarship, it’s still outrageously priced. The middle class can’t afford that shit.
The one we just enrolled my son in is $10k per year for kindergarten and it gets more expensive as they get older. Then, of course, we'll end up paying for after school programs and portions of the summer camps.

It sounds like a lot, but it's really not much more than we are paying for his preschool now.
[Reply]
BucEyedPea 01:40 PM 02-12-2020
IMO this is what comprehensive educational reform should include:


1. Reform has to begin at teacher colleges or universities with such programs. They need to be retrained. I won't go into all details here, but reform has to start beyond just allowing more competition between schools using choice.

2. Textbook industry which supplies both public and private schools has to be reformed.

3. Teacher Unions Need to be cleaned out of political operatives. This one is difficult. Also the social scientists behind the pushed goobaly-gook.

4. The trendiness in educational changes needs to stop because it uses students as guinea pigs. These should be relegated to a small segment to test workability with full disclosure to parents.

So the people in the system are the ones who created the problem, or have perpetuated it because of their own education. The cannot reform it. They won't reform to good results. Each reform is a failure even making it worse in some cases. The reform has to come from the outside of the education industry, imo.

Not doing these things and only relying on choice or tax credits won't be enough. At least with those added to reform, poorer students and middle-class folks who can't afford private schools or have the option to homeschool would have a chance. We're still going to be living an a world where the poorly educated, leftist indoctrinated can affect our quality of life, lose our liberties, whether our kids were in them or not. They also need life skills and taught how to survive in a free society with less govt and in markets.

In the meantime, the best option is to remove your kids from them. If you can't you have to be on top on the curriculum and text books they're learning from and other developments to counteract the effects. Until it's properly reformed where they become places for more children.


JMO
[Reply]
F150 05:03 PM 02-12-2020
Originally Posted by Detoxing:
At some point ya'll gotta stop blaming the government and schools.

The parent SHOULD have the most communication with the child.

The Child will likely learn from you just by being around you so much. He'll pick up your habits, manners, work ethic and in some cases, even your walk.

You're the parent, you carry more influence than the teacher or school.

If the child isn't doing well in private/public school then maybe YOU, the parent should help the child by spending extra time with him instead of watching him fail and then blaming an institution.

Quit blaming the government for every goddamn thing. It's such a lazy, right wing take.

The buck stops at home. The kids who excel are the kids who get the most pressure at home to do well, and get the most assistance.

WHERE the education comes from doesn't matter nearly as much as good parenting.
Its not right wing to blame govt for the decline of education quality, its just true and honest.

Govt has slowly taken over local control of education. Where once local control and local finance was in charge now its two layers of government..state and federal, often unfunded mandates tied to money we send to DC or state capitals and we get back 40% while they suck 60 to administer bullshit

then we have NEA and that bullshit
[Reply]
Iowanian 06:56 PM 02-12-2020
I feel bad for homeschool kids.


When they get a chance to be in the "hot teacher bangs a student" thread, everyone judges and makes fun of them.
[Reply]
Inspector 08:04 PM 02-12-2020
I was born a poor black child and got most of my learnin' from the carnival workers who I traveled with.

Plus my grandma used to fart a lot too. I learned many things from those farts.
[Reply]
Iowanian 08:08 PM 02-12-2020
Dag nabbit. 10 posts late on the teacher banging joke.
[Reply]
cosmo20002 09:17 PM 02-12-2020
Originally Posted by Randallflagg:
Frankly, I don't believe that the idea of "public" schools is necessarily bad. Throughout the history of this country, 99% of the kids were taught in public schools and most turned out well.

Here's the problem (that has reared its ugly head since around 1980):

Teachers unions, political interference with schools and teachers and finally NOT following the curriculum that TEACHES children those things that they need to go forward. "Reading Writing and Arithmetic"? Yeah, right.......

Teachers are treating kids like "little warriors" for the gay, the political, the gender nonsense, political action, civil rights, and finally - teaching them that the problems of the world reside in the US. I just saw a news story that showed kids walking out in "protest" than teachers "aren't making enough money". Proof enough for me.

And every political season what is it we hear from the left? Teachers should be paid more.

Teachers today are (in my opinion) more concerned with their retirement than teaching their students.
The nerve of some people caring how they might live in their old age.
[Reply]
BucEyedPea 09:34 AM 02-26-2020
Like this Advance Placement course:
Baltimore County AP History Class Lumps President Trump with Communism and Nazism


The Blaze reported that a Baltimore County school is currently under fire for a lesson presentation which drew parallels between President Donald Trump’s immigration policies and the totalitarian ideologies of Nazism and Communism.

The lesson slide garnering so much outrage shows depicts Trump with a caption that reads, “Wants to round up a group of people and build a giant wall.” Beneath the Trump image and caption are two images, one of a swastika that reads “been there,” and the other image was one that reads “done that.”

The slide also read, “Oh that’s why it sounds so familiar!”

According to WBFF-TV, the image was presented in class on Wednesday, February 19, 2020. Parents are fuming about this content.
...

The College Board, which is in charge of the AP program, does not set the curriculum for teachers. [ Creator of slide is still not known].


https://bigleaguepolitics.com/baltim...sm-and-nazism/

[Reply]
Merde Furieux 12:16 PM 02-26-2020
The Council on Foreign Relations controls the media, schools, tech companies, the Democrat party since Woodrow Wilson was elected in 1912, and our money since they set up the 16th Amendment in 1913 (income tax), and the 17th Amendment (direct election of senators, so they only had to win 51 races, instead of the thousands it would take to control 51 state legislatures), along with the Federal Reserve.

They funded Communism in Russia and China, and just like they brainwashed millions to murder 100 million, they are hard at work here, brainwashing American children too.
[Reply]
Coyote 12:59 PM 02-26-2020
All schools (public, private, charter) have to be carefully reviewed-not just the district-the individual school. I believe in good public schools. Particularly for elementary education. The system for funding needs to be reviewed after 100 plus years. There are way too many school districts that causes classroom $ to be siphoned off as overhead costs as well.

The pedagogy shows that parental involvement matters more than other factors. Look at volunteer rates as a key indicator. Then look at each case and decide where the kid(s) and the family circumstances fit.

The use of property taxes as a principle means to fund public schools has (and likely will) led to very disparate public school systems. See Kozol’s (huge leftist like many public educators but doesn’t mean some points are without merit) book The Shame of a Nation.

Points to we now have more segregation across the country than before Brown vs. board of Education SC decision,due primarily to property taxes as basis of school funding. He falls off by going into his opinions as to the causes of historic white flight, etc. Look at the KC public schools case study with judges, mandates , $ on buildings, etc. None of it worked-little % of involved parents.

I never taught kids but when back home, always coached ( spring fighting season still holds for most of the world) and volunteered way past my kids high school and then got 1 of my advance degrees in Education with an emphasis on testing. We ( Marines) get the products of this system and have to do much more shaping than just teaching the military arts to rank groups.
[Reply]
Coyote 02:22 PM 02-26-2020
Originally Posted by BucEyedPea:
Just make sure you check those textbooks, because the textbook industry slips that stuff in too. I had to do that before I made my final choice for my daughter. One had several pages of Marilyn Monroe and a short paragraph on George Washington. :-)

I recall my daughter's first school, a private one I used for kindergarten, the principal told me she had to refuse a textbook salesman, who's pitch told her that she had gays in her school so the new books covered gay issues. It was a Christian school he was pitching these books too. That was late 90's. It has to be worse now.
I’m late to this discussion, please excuse me. As to accuracy in textbooks and curriculum/ lesson plans. This is particularly true with History. Somewhat true with sociology and disproportionately so in high school AP programs. AP programs became an internal line in students and teacher quality demarcations.

Anyway, I was speaking to a class one time and was asked a weird question when 1 of my football players, dimed out the questioner for asking me the homework answer due the next day. I would have asked it.
So we discussed it and with the teacher. The teacher then showed me the teacher’s edition textbook and state curriculum she was following.

The US history book said we fought in Grenada in order to get Reagan re-elected. We fought in Kosovo because we had the first female Secretary of State (apparently that mattered as to our European engagements)

I always used that when leading seminars for officers chosen for OSD Policy in professional education subjects of our past conflicts case studies.

It was an example of bias being written as history and things not being taught or seen by others as they might perceive them.
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