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Washington DC and The Holy Land>*****Official George Floyd/MPLS Police dep trial*****
displacedinMN 09:47 AM 01-12-2021
Under Special Request-Shortened to help out

What happened -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_George_Floyd

Results and riots https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd_protests

Trials-Latest

Spoiler!



Charges
Spoiler!


I will update things as I can-I have full RedStarTrib access.

Live tweets from Red Star http://live.startribune.com/Event/Li...rial_testimony

KARE 11 Live Stream with experts. https://www.kare11.com/watch?vid=5b7...b-8073ea5b7450
[Reply]
DaneMcCloud 10:23 PM 01-21-2021
Originally Posted by GloryDayz:
Oh my, I've flat out pissed you off. This is fun.

Tell us more lies about your Hollywood ties and best friends. We like fun stories.. So far (tonight) it's CD, who next?

Do you take requests?

:-)
This is more than you deserve.

https://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=299405

DaneMcCloud - CP's Hollywood insider. Whether it's a movie star, rock star, or porn star, he usually has a story about them. Great football knowledge and also well known for his epic online throwdowns.
[Reply]
BossChief 11:15 PM 01-21-2021
The cops were called by the store clerk that Floyd passed a fake 20 on while being high out of his mind. Floyd was so high he left the store and sat in the car -high as fuck- till the police came. When the police get there, he eats the rest of the bag of fentanyl and then is taken from the car drops another bag of fentanyl on the ground while stumbling.

The cops tried to put him in the back of the cop car multiple times. While they tried putting him in the car, he says multiple times he can’t breathe. He asked for his mom before he was ever on the ground. When they try putting him in the car, he frantically says he can’t breathe and that he’s claustrophobic. He won’t stay in the cop car. Chauvin puts him on the ground and puts his knee on his neck for 9 minutes while George again says he can’t breathe and calls for his mom. Goes limp and Chauvin keeps his knee on his neck 2 minutes (approx) after he’s limp. The crowd says over and over he’s limp. The other officers seemingly look to see that’s the case.

George had enough Fentanyl in his system that it would be considered a suicide if he was found with that level in his body alone and dead...but that in no way absolves Chauvin for his actions. Chauvin and Floyd even bounced for the same nightclub previously, so some have said that played a role in his he was treated that day. George had a nasty criminal history, so it makes sense.

Now...it’s impossible to know if Chauvin killed Floyd or if it was the drugs...but it was likely a combination of the 2.

Here’s my problem with the way these situations are handled...

1) Chauvin should have been able to identify when his restraining technique was effective dnough to easily put George in the cop car and/or call for medical assistance for the drug situation.

2) The other officers don’t even attempt to step in.

To justify those actions is wrong, but so is putting 100% of the blame for George’s death on Chauvin when George chose to overdose on drugs.
[Reply]
Hoopsdoc 12:03 AM 01-22-2021
Originally Posted by BossChief:
The cops were called by the store clerk that Floyd passed a fake 20 on while being high out of his mind. Floyd was so high he left the store and sat in the car -high as ****- till the police came. When the police get there, he eats the rest of the bag of fentanyl and then is taken from the car drops another bag of fentanyl on the ground while stumbling.

The cops tried to put him in the back of the cop car multiple times. While they tried putting him in the car, he says multiple times he canít breathe. He asked for his mom before he was ever on the ground. When they try putting him in the car, he frantically says he canít breathe and that heís claustrophobic. He wonít stay in the cop car. Chauvin puts him on the ground and puts his knee on his neck for 9 minutes while George again says he canít breathe and calls for his mom. Goes limp and Chauvin keeps his knee on his neck 2 minutes (approx) after heís limp. The crowd says over and over heís limp. The other officers seemingly look to see thatís the case.

George had enough Fentanyl in his system that it would be considered a suicide if he was found with that level in his body alone and dead...but that in no way absolves Chauvin for his actions. Chauvin and Floyd even bounced for the same nightclub previously, so some have said that played a role in his he was treated that day. George had a nasty criminal history, so it makes sense.

Now...itís impossible to know if Chauvin killed Floyd or if it was the drugs...but it was likely a combination of the 2.

Hereís my problem with the way these situations are handled...

1) Chauvin should have been able to identify when his restraining technique was effective dnough to easily put George in the cop car and/or call for medical assistance for the drug situation.

2) The other officers donít even attempt to step in.

To justify those actions is wrong, but so is putting 100% of the blame for Georgeís death on Chauvin when George chose to overdose on drugs.
This sort of evenhanded analysis isnít welcome here, mister. You take that shit outside.
[Reply]
Discuss Thrower 12:37 AM 01-22-2021
It's amusing to see the 180 from someone saying "cops aren't supposed to shoot guilty people either" six months ago to "MAGAtard woman deserved to get fucking shot" now.
[Reply]
scorpio 01:00 AM 01-22-2021
Originally Posted by petegz28:
Odds that Floyd is alive today and probably back on the streets being a criminal if he just did what the Cops told him to do???

I say 99%
You just love seeing a black guy get what's coming to him.
[Reply]
Flying High D 06:26 AM 01-22-2021
Pretty sure if George would of been white nobody would of even gave two shits to video it.
[Reply]
GloryDayz 07:18 AM 01-22-2021
Originally Posted by DaneMcCloud:
This is more than you deserve.

https://chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=299405

DaneMcCloud - CP's Hollywood insider. Whether it's a movie star, rock star, or porn star, he usually has a story about them. Great football knowledge and also well known for his epic online throwdowns.
:-) Tell us more about Hollywood stars... You know, between your silly takes on all other things worldly.
[Reply]
GloryDayz 07:22 AM 01-22-2021
George Floyd should have posted a "Ten Things About Getting High and Physically Resisting Arrest" piece?
[Reply]
Prison Bitch 11:11 AM 01-22-2021

https://t.co/mGIkKs8yTN pic.twitter.com/JzuRUcMVw6

— 𝗥𝗝 𝗠𝗮𝗰𝗥𝗲𝗮𝗱𝘆🇦🇶 (@SouthPoleRJ) January 8, 2021

[Reply]
Ninerfan11 03:35 PM 01-22-2021
I hope the cops are deemed innocent so I can get some more electronics. I have a nice, brand new Target in my city...my body is ready.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 05:05 PM 01-26-2021
MINNEAPOLIS — Information about George Floyd’s prior arrests can’t be used at the trials of four former Minneapolis police officers charged in his death, but jurors will be allowed to hear details about two previous incidents involving the officer who kneeled on Floyd’s neck, a judge ruled.

In an order dated Monday and made public Tuesday, Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill said he would explain his decisions at a later date.

Floyd, who was Black and handcuffed, died May 25 after Officer Derek Chauvin, who is white, pressed his knee against Floyd’s neck as Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. Floyd’s death was captured in widely seen bystander video that set off protests, sometimes violent, that spread around the world.

Chauvin and the three other officers who took part in Floyd’s arrest were fired. Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter. Thomas Lane, J. Kueng and Tou Thao, are charged with aiding and abetting those crimes.

Prosecutors had asked Cahill to allow them to introduce evidence that showed Chauvin had used neck or head and upper body restraints seven times before, including four times in which prosecutors say he went too far.

Cahill ruled that prosecutors can’t bring up most of those prior cases during Chauvin’s trial, but they can tell the jury about a June 2017 arrest in which Chauvin restrained a female by placing his knee on her neck while she was prone on the ground.

RELATED: Judge rejects state's request to reconsider separate trial for Derek Chauvin

The judge also ruled that prosecutors can tell jurors about an August 2015 incident in which Chauvin saw other officers place a suicidal and intoxicated male into a side-recovery position after using a stun gun on him. Prosecutors had noted that the officers received a commendation, after medical professionals said the male could have died if they had prolonged his detention. Cahill said prosecutors can mention it only if they can provide clear and convincing evidence that Chauvin was present when the medical professional made those remarks.

Defense attorneys had asked for permission to bring up details about Floyd’s prior arrests, including a May 2019 arrest in which they said he acted in a way that was similar to his behavior on the day of his death. They also wanted to introduce evidence of a prior armed robbery arrest in Texas. In court documents, Lane’s attorney described Floyd as an ex-convict, a violent defendant and a liar.

An attorney for Floyd’s family had called the defense comments a character assassination. Legal experts told The Associated Press that a blame-the-victim approach is a common defense strategy and can sway public opinion outside of court, but that prior incidents can’t be brought up in court simply to smear people.

Cahill’s order also denies the state’s request to bring up prior on-the-job incidents involving Thao and Kueng, again without providing a reason.

Chauvin’s trial is scheduled to begin March 8. The other defendants’ trial is set to start in August.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 05:07 PM 01-26-2021
Side note:


Originally Posted by :
The Minneapolis Police Department on Monday night downplayed word that Chief Medaria Arradondo is on a list of candidates to become police chief of San Jose, Calif.

According to documents from the city of San Jose, he is one of six finalists and will be part of a candidate forum Saturday and involved in subsequent interviews.

MPD spokesman John Elder said in a statement Monday night that while Arradondo is "humbled and honored" to be considered for the job, he "remains committed to the public safety of the residents and businesses of Minneapolis and continuing the important MPD transformational change in the spirit of healing and moving our city forward in collaboration with our communities."

Elder said a recruiter asked the chief for his rťsumť and got permission from Arradondo to send it to San Jose. "The chief has yet to have any conversation with any elected official from San Jose," Elder said.

Arradondo has faced numerous challenges in the past year as the city has struggled to combat a dramatic increase in violent crime amid a wave of officer departures in the aftermath of George Floyd's death. He has clashed with members of the City Council who have questioned the role of police in the city and pledged to work toward "ending" the department following Floyd's death.

Most recently, a small group of City Council members is once again working on a proposal that could replace the current Police Department.

The proposal, which would have to go before voters, could place police and other public safety programs under a new department.

The San Jose Police Department extended its national search application window for a police chief from Dec. 31 to Jan. 14, according to the Mercury News in San Jose. Officials hope to name a new chief by the end of February.

The city used the recruiting firm Public Sector Search and Consulting for the search.

Arradondo joined the force in 1989 as a patrol officer in the Fourth Precinct and was named inspector of the First Precinct in 2013.

He was appointed to head the MPD in 2017.

[Reply]
GloucesterChief 05:14 PM 01-26-2021
My thoughts are murder would be very hard to prove but there is a definite case of failure to provide aid here. Not sure if that reaches manslaughter in MN though.
[Reply]
displacedinMN 06:27 PM 01-28-2021
This sounds more like Ellison throwing a tantrum.


Originally Posted by :
Prosecutors in the George Floyd case took the unusual step Thursday of asking the Minnesota Court of Appeals to intervene after a lower court judge twice refused their request to hold one trial for all four ex-Minneapolis police officers in August.

The request from Attorney General Keith Ellison's office accused Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill of violating state law and abusing his power when he ordered that one trial would start in March and the second would start five months later.

Ellison's office, which is leading the prosecution, had argued for one trial in the summertime when more people would be vaccinated against COVID-19.

"The District Court's decision … to proceed with two trials creates a serious public health risk," Assistant Attorney General Matthew Frank wrote in his request to the Court of Appeals. " … District Court's decision violates the law and threatens serious harms to public health."

Frank wrote that Cahill's decisions were "a clear abuse of power."

Ellison's office is asking the Court of Appeals to reverse Cahill's decision and compel him to hold one trial in the summer.

Prosecutors had filed a motion in late December requesting one trial starting June 7 because of COVID-19.

Cahill ruled Jan. 11 that the four fired Minneapolis police officers charged in Floyd's May 25 death would be tried in two separate trials because the county's largest courtroom could not safely accommodate four defendants due to COVID safety protocols.

Ellison's office filed a motion earlier this month asking Cahill to reconsider his ruling, and again asked for a summer trial with an unspecified start date. Cahill rejected that motion two days later.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin will be tried in Hennepin County starting March 8. His former colleagues — J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao — will be tried in one trial starting Aug. 23.

[Reply]
displacedinMN 09:47 AM 01-30-2021
Trials could be super spreader event


Originally Posted by :
Prosecutors in the George Floyd case urged the Minnesota Court of Appeals to stop a scheduled March trial for one of the ex-Minneapolis police officers charged in the case because it could become a COVID-19 superspreader event.

Attorney General Keith Ellison's office, which is leading the prosecution, filed a 59-page brief Friday detailing why Hennepin County District Judge Peter Cahill was wrong to split the trials of four former Minneapolis officers into two, with one starting in March and a second in August.

"This appeal involves a question of exceptional and unique importance in one of the highest-profile cases in our Nation's history," wrote Assistant Attorney General Matthew Frank and Special Attorney for the State Neal Katyal. " … This is a matter, quite literally, of life and death."

Prosecutors argued that their proposal to hold one trial in the summer when more people would be vaccinated against COVID-19 was the only safe option, and that a trial in March could have "potentially catastrophic consequences for public health." The trial will involve an unusually large number of witnesses and participants, as well as draw potentially thousands of demonstrators to the courthouse, exacerbating the danger, they added.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is scheduled to be tried on second-degree murder and manslaughter charges on March 8 starting with jury selection. Opening statements are expected to begin March 29, with about a month of testimony and evidence about Floyd's May 25 death to follow.

His former colleagues — J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao — are scheduled to be tried in one trial starting Aug. 23. They are charged with aiding and abetting murder and manslaughter. All four have posted bond.

"The District Court disregarded the overwhelming evidence demonstrating that a trial for any of the Defendants on March 8 would be 'extremely dangerous,' and that it is 'extremely likely that one or more' trial participants — lawyers, witnesses, jurors, or court staff — would contract the coronavirus during a trial held in March 2021," the brief said.

Prosecutors had filed motions in December and mid-January asking for one trial in the summer due to COVID-19 risks. Cahill rejected the proposition both times, noting that the county's largest courtroom could not accommodate all four defendants at once because of COVID safety protocols.

Ellison's office is asking the Court of Appeals to reverse Cahill's rulings and compel him to hold one trial in the summer based on recommendations from nationally renowned health experts, doctors Ezekiel Emanuel and Michael Osterholm, provided by prosecutors.

"The undisputed evidence showed that a trial in the case in March 2021 could be a superspreader event, and could place a significant burden on the health care system at a time when cases are likely to be on the rise based on the likely prevalence of a new, more transmissible variant of the coronavirus …," the brief said.

Prosecutors filed a motion last year to join all four defendants' trials into one to spare witnesses and Floyd's family undue stress, among other reasons. Cahill had granted the request last November, then laid out the new trial plan in January after Hennepin County Chief Judge Toddrick Barnette asked him to split the trials in order to accommodate COVID safety measures.

Prosecutors took issue with Cahill rescinding his initial plan and creating a new one without briefing attorneys or hearing arguments on the matter. They accused the judge of violating the law, abusing his power and ignoring procedures in the Minnesota Rules of Criminal Procedure that govern when a trial should be divided.

"Instead of analyzing the factors required by [the Minnesota Rules of Criminal Procedure], the District Court relied on an e-mail from Chief Judge Barnette," prosecutors wrote. " … No provision of law allows the trial court to disregard" the rule.

Cahill had cited the very rule in his November decision to support holding one trial despite pleas from all four defense teams for separate trials, prosecutors noted.

Mitchell Hamline School of Law emeritus professor Joseph Daly reviewed the prosecution's brief and found it "quite convincing."

"My prediction is that the appellate court is going to step in very quickly and stop this trial on March 8," he said. "I think this is a very convincing, strongly worded brief."

The Court of Appeals must review all matters brought before it and has up to 90 days to issue a decision.

Prosecutors requested a hearing so they could argue their case orally but also asked the Court of Appeals to entertain the option of skipping a hearing and immediately issuing a "writ of prohibition" to stop the March trial.

Daly said if the court were to immediately stop the trial, it could later hold a hearing to determine whether the four defendants should be tried together or separately.

If the court does not rule in the attorney general's favor, prosecutors could petition the Minnesota Supreme Court to address the matter. A review by the Supreme Court is not guaranteed.

"This is maybe the most important trial that's ever taken place in the state of Minnesota," Daly said. "It has caused a worldwide response, a social response. It has forced people to really look at the authority and power that we give police worldwide."

Chao Xiong • 612-270-4708

[Reply]
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