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Washington DC and The Holy Land>Is 'Baby its Cold Outside" still part of your holiday rotation?
Deberg_1990 07:27 PM 12-03-2018
Well, is it?




DENVER — The only FM station in the Denver market exclusively playing Christmas music during the holiday season will no longer play “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.”

KOSI 101.1’s program director said that the decision was made based on listeners’ feedback.

“We are aware of the controversy regarding ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ and based on feedback from our listeners we have decided to pull the song from KOSI 101.1,” said Program Director Jim Lawson in an email to FOX31.

In the song, a man is trying to convince a woman to stay with him instead of returning home, citing poor weather. The female vocalist sings, “I really can’t stay,” to which the male singer responds, “But baby, it’s cold outside.”

Other lyrics sung by the woman include: “Say, what’s in this drink?” and “I simply must go … The answer is ‘no.’”

A Cleveland station recently gained national attention when it stopped playing the song, referencing the “Me Too” movement.

Shortly this story was published, KOSI 101.1 posted a poll on its website asking whether the song should be aired.

https://kdvr.com/2018/12/03/kosi-101...ners-feedback/
[Reply]
Donger 09:42 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Trolly McTrollson:
Fault: statement. 2-0 the score, your serve.
Incorrect. Here:

https://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/show...&postcount=133

That's what I was responding to, obviously.
[Reply]
Trolly McTrollson 09:47 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Donger:
Incorrect. Here:

https://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/show...&postcount=133

That's what I was responding to, obviously.
You don’t know the rules to Verbal Tennis?
[Reply]
Donger 09:48 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Trolly McTrollson:
You don’t know the rules to Verbal Tennis?
No. What does proving you wrong via your own words score?
[Reply]
Katipan 09:48 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Baby Lee:
The **** you have. You've never indicated what your beef is, only that you harbor strong resentment towards me for no discernible reason.

Maybe best you just avoid me. I really have no problem with you. I've never had a cross thought towards, except in your expressed hatred and unwillingness to explain. And I truly wish for an opportunity to face my charges and atone.
Promise me you'll smoke some pot and we'll be peachy.
I even have a $300 gold leaf blunt if that helps.
[Reply]
Katipan 09:49 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Donger:
No. What does proving you wrong via your own words score?
Love all
[Reply]
Trolly McTrollson 09:56 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Katipan:
Love all
“No” was clearly not a question, so I think it’s match point for Trolly.
[Reply]
Loneiguana 10:00 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by listopencil:
It's an old way of spiking a drink. It's still irrelevant, of course, because the woman in the song is referring to social pressures that keep her from enjoying a sexual relationship rather than a 'rapey' would-be lover.
It seems to wierd to normalize pressuring someone into doing something sexual just because of the reason the person being pressured was saying no.

Just like it seems wierd to normalize getting a women intoxicated to make it easier get her to give in.

But hey, let's just make excuses rather than be honest the song is a little creepy. You are all adults, i think, you shouldnt care what other people think. If you still like the song, good for you.

I like the band Confederate railwoard.i dont care what people think and i will admit their songs are trashy.
[Reply]
CoMoChief 10:11 AM 12-06-2018
Im late to this party, not going to back to see if this has been addressed, and it may have

but...

Is it time that we ban rap music too? Since everyone wants to be so offended by everything.

Liberals want to control language and culture. They claim to be the party of tolerance when they're just the exact opposite. They're control freaks.
[Reply]
mlyonsd 10:14 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by CoMoChief:
Im late to this party, not going to back to see if this has been addressed, and it may have

but...

Is it time that we ban rap music too? Since everyone wants to be so offended by everything.

Liberals want to control language and culture. They claim to be the party of tolerance when they're just the exact opposite. They're control freaks.
There would be too many people thrown out of work because they don't have the talent to actually you know, sing.
[Reply]
patteeu 10:16 AM 12-06-2018
Oh great, “can I buy you a drink” is now creepy. :-)
[Reply]
Baby Lee 10:18 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Loneiguana:
It seems to wierd to normalize pressuring someone into doing something sexual just because of the reason the person being pressured was saying no.

Just like it seems wierd to normalize getting a women intoxicated to make it easier get her to give in.

But hey, let's just make excuses rather than be honest the song is a little creepy. You are all adults, i think, you shouldnt care what other people think. If you still like the song, good for you.

I like the band Confederate railwoard.i dont care what people think and i will admit their songs are trashy.
Pressuring the unwilling is a severely limited and stilted lens through which to view the exchange. There are millions of examples and eons of interactions demonstrating that playing hard to get and the thrill of the chase can be stimulating for both parties.

And 'what's in this drink' is by no means an allegation of a purposeful effort by the man to intoxicate the woman, by subterfuge or otherwise. There's no indication who prepared it or if there is actually anything in it at all.
[Reply]
Loneiguana 10:22 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Baby Lee:
Pressuring the unwilling is a severely limited and stilted lens through which to view the exchange. There are millions of examples and eons of interactions demonstrating that playing hard to get and the thrill of the chase can be stimulating for both parties.

And 'what's in this drink' is by no means an allegation of a purposeful effort by the man to intoxicate the woman, by subterfuge or otherwise. There's no indication who prepared it or if there is actually anything in it at all.
People who were aware of before the fact that they were to be served alcohol usually ask "whats in this drink" after trying it. Totally common remark.

How insecure are all of you that people noticing a damn Christmas song is a little creepy somehow affects your enjoyment of the song? So much so that you have to resort to incel-type excuses on the internet?
[Reply]
Donger 10:23 AM 12-06-2018
I find the word "rape" to be offense. I prefer "cuddle with a struggle."

Henceforth, please use it.
[Reply]
patteeu 10:28 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by Donger:
I find the word "rape" to be offense. I prefer "cuddle with a struggle."

Henceforth, please use it.
:-)
[Reply]
Discuss Thrower 10:29 AM 12-06-2018
Originally Posted by :
It’s time to bring an end to the Rape Anthem Masquerading As Christmas Carol

Hi there! Former English nerd/teacher here. Also a big fan of jazz of the 30s and 40s.

So. Here’s the thing. Given a cursory glance and applying today’s worldview to the song, yes, you’re right, it absolutely *sounds* like a rape anthem.

BUT! Let’s look closer!

“Hey what’s in this drink” was a stock joke at the time, and the punchline was invariably that there’s actually pretty much nothing in the drink, not even a significant amount of alcohol.

See, this woman is staying late, unchaperoned, at a dude’s house. In the 1940’s, that’s the kind of thing Good Girls aren’t supposed to do — and she wants people to think she’s a good girl. The woman in the song says outright, multiple times, that what other people will think of her staying is what she’s really concerned about: “the neighbors might think,” “my maiden aunt’s mind is vicious,” “there’s bound to be talk tomorrow.” But she’s having a really good time, and she wants to stay, and so she is excusing her uncharacteristically bold behavior (either to the guy or to herself) by blaming it on the drink — unaware that the drink is actually really weak, maybe not even alcoholic at all. That’s the joke. That is the standard joke that’s going on when a woman in media from the early-to-mid 20th century says “hey, what’s in this drink?” It is not a joke about how she’s drunk and about to be raped. It’s a joke about how she’s perfectly sober and about to have awesome consensual sex and use the drink for plausible deniability because she’s living in a society where women aren’t supposed to have sexual agency.

Basically, the song only makes sense in the context of a society in which women are expected to reject men’s advances whether they actually want to or not, and therefore it’s normal and expected for a lady’s gentleman companion to pressure her despite her protests, because he knows she would have to say that whether or not she meant it, and if she really wants to stay she won’t be able to justify doing so unless he offers her an excuse other than “I’m staying because I want to.” (That’s the main theme of the man’s lines in the song, suggesting excuses she can use when people ask later why she spent the night at his house: it was so cold out, there were no cabs available, he simply insisted because he was concerned about my safety in such awful weather, it was perfectly innocent and definitely not about sex at all!) In this particular case, he’s pretty clearly right, because the woman has a voice, and she’s using it to give all the culturally-understood signals that she actually does want to stay but can’t say so. She states explicitly that she’s resisting because she’s supposed to, not because she wants to: “I ought to say no no no…” She states explicitly that she’s just putting up a token resistance so she’ll be able to claim later that she did what’s expected of a decent woman in this situation: “at least I’m gonna say that I tried.” And at the end of the song they’re singing together, in harmony, because they’re both on the same page and they have been all along.

So it’s not actually a song about rape - in fact it’s a song about a woman finding a way to exercise sexual agency in a patriarchal society designed to stop her from doing so. But it’s also, at the same time, one of the best illustrations of rape culture that pop culture has ever produced. It’s a song about a society where women aren’t allowed to say yes…which happens to mean it’s also a society where women don’t have a clear and unambiguous way to say no.
End Thread
[Reply]
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